M 0148
LETTERS TO THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

FROM OFFICERS BELOW THE RANK OF COMMANDER

AND FROM WARRANT OFFICERS, 1802-1884,

IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES (517 ROLLS)

 

  Note:  Only those rolls covering periods when CONSTITUTION was in squadron service have been researched.  

 

Roll 1, Vol 1 (April 29, 1802 ‑ December 30, 1805)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (January 1 ‑ May 31, 1806)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 2, Vol 3 (June 2 ‑ August 30, 1806)

 

From Midshipman Octavus A. Page, 2 Jun 1806:

 

        [Note spelling of first name: occurs four times.]

 

From Midshipman Lewis Hunt, Charlestown, MA, 16 Jun 1806:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of SecNav letter soliciting subscriptions for the Tripoli monument.  Notes he subscribed prior to leaving the Mediterranean.

 

From Lieutenant Charles Ludlow, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Jul 1806:

 

        Reports remaining in the Mediterranean as 1st Lieutenant of CONSTITUTION per Commodore Rodgers' order.  Calls CONSTITUTION "one of the first Frigates in the World."  Had been in ESSEX.

 

Vol 4 (September 1 ‑ December 31, 1806)

 

From Midshipman Walter Winter, Allens Fresh, MD, 1 Sep 1806:

 

        Notes receipt of SecNav letter circulating a letter from Captain Porter seeking contributions for the Tripoli monument.  Sends $5.

 

From George Davis, Gibraltar, 10 Sep 1806:

 

        CONSTITUTION has gone to Lisbon to procure and set up new rigging.

 

Roll 3, Vol 5 (January 1 ‑ April 30, 1807)

 

From Midshipman Jacob Hite, 14 Feb 1807:

 

        [Note spelling of last name.]

 

Vol 6 (May 1 ‑ July 31, 1807)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 4, Vol 7 (August 1 ‑ December 31, 1807)

 

From Surgeon Samuel D. Heap, 31 Oct 1807:

 

        Written on board CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman James P. Wilmer, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Nov 1807:

 

        Requests leave.

 

From Surgeon's Mate George Colegate, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Nov 1807:

 

        Requests leave.

 

From Midshipman Thomas Shields, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Nov 1807:

 

        Requests 2‑3 months leave to regain health.

 

From Midshipman James Marshall, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Nov 1807:

 

        Requests leave.

 

From Purser Gwinn Harris, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Nov 1807:

 

        Money receipt.

 

From Lieutenant Melancthon T. Woolsey, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Dec 1807:

 

        Leave request; notes crew "about to be discharged."

 

From Purser James Tootell, USS WASP, 5 Dec 1807:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or other frigate.

 

From Midshipman James McGlanhon, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Dec 1807:

 

        Settling accounts.

 

From Acting Midshipman Divier Rouchas, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Dec 1807:

 

        Requests a regular warrant, noting he transferred to CONSTITUTION from ESSEX in the Mediterranean.

 

Vol 8 (January 2 ‑ April 30, 1808)

 

From Midshipman P. Muhlenberg, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Mar 1808:

 

        Requests transfer to the New Orleans Station.

 

Roll 5, Vol 9 (May 1 ‑ December 31, 1808)

 

From Bary [sic: former Ordinary Seaman Bernard] McDermott, Ramapo Works, NY, 10 Sep 1808:

 

        Sailed from Boston in CONSTITUTION, "Prebble," in Jun 1803.  Served 27 months in ship and several prizes were taken.  How do I get my share of prize money?

 

From Midshipman William C. Hazell, Philadelphia, PA, 8 Oct 1808:

 

        Received warrant in January; requests orders to CONSTITUTION "or any other vessel."

 

Vol 10 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1809)

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, to Captain Joseph Smith, Baltimore, MD, 29 May 1809 [misfiled at 7 Feb 1809]:

 

        Midshipman Joseph E. Smith is on board.

 

From Surgeon J. G. Hunt, New York Navy Yard, 9 Feb 1809:

 

        Learned "this morning" he is ordered to CONSTITUTION.  Regrets that poor health will preclude his service.

 

From Purser James Tootell, USS WASP, 10 Feb 1809:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to USS PRESIDENT.]

 

From Lieutenant Francis J. Mitchell, USS ARGUS, 12 Feb 1809:

 

        Acknowledges orders to CONSTITUTION as Acting Lieutenant.  Will join when ARGUS reaches New York.

 

From Purser Clement S. Hunt, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Mar 1809:

 

        Submits his bond.

 

Roll 6, Vol 11 (April 1 ‑ June 26, 1809)[mislabeled June 26 ‑ August 31, 1809]

 

From Lieutenant Charles Ludlow, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1809:

 

        Makes a complaint.

 

From Lieutenant George W. Reed, Philadelphia, PA, 9 Jul 1809:

 

        Acknowledges orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Charles Ludlow, USS VIXEN, 11 Jul 1809:

 

        Reports assuming command.

 

From Lieutenant George W. Reed, New York, NY, 19 Jul 1809:

 

        Tenders resignation.

 

From Lieutenant James Renshaw, New York, NY, 12 Aug 1809:

 

        Reports bringing a draft of petty officers and men from CHESAPEAKE in Boston to CONSTITUTION; requests orders for himself.  The enclosed orders from Captain Isaac Hull also note that "Midshipman Allen" will assist him.

 

From Midshipman William Campbell, Albany, NY, 15 Aug 1809:

 

        Received his warrant in February.  Hoped for a "birth" in CONSTITUTION, but was told she was full.  Would still like to be in that ship.

 

Roll 7, Vol 13 (September 1 ‑ December 31, 1809)

 

From Midshipman John H. Elton, USS JOHN ADAMS, 3 Oct 1809:

 

        Once captained Gunboat 51 "Constitution's Tender;" but sailed with his crew in Gunboat 97, although not formally in commission, because she was in better shape.  Made some captures.  Asks about his official status at the time and whether or not he and his crew are due prize money.

 

From Lieutenant Theodore Hunt, USS HORNET, 26 Oct 1809:

 

        Dr. Thorn now in "city" [New York], having been relieved in CONSTITUTION by Dr. Griffin.

 

From Surgeon's Mate John Reynolds, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Nov 1809:

 

        Requests leave.

 

Vol 14 (January 1 ‑ June 30, 1810)

 

 From Lieutenant Theodore Hunt, USS HORNET, 30 Mar 1810;

 

        Notes that CONSTITUTION has "dropped down to the Hook."  Had been using the services of her Surgeon for his crew.  Requests one.

 

From Lieutenant Ralph Izard, New York, NY, 12 Apr 1810:

 

        Has gotten Commodore Rodgers' permission to leave CONSTITUTION.  Tenders his resignation.

 

From Lieutenant Charles L. Ridgely, Baltimore, MD, 20 Apr 1810:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Chaplain Robert Thompson, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 May 1810:

 

        Ship is expected to sail at 1500 that day for Annapolis where he will transfer to Washington, DC, and then to PRESIDENT.  Desires Midshipman Delphy accompany him.

 

From Lieutenant Ralph Izard, Philadelphia, PA, 2 May 1810:

 

        Explains that his resignation was due to a disagreement with Commodore Rodgers in which he felt he was ill‑used.

 

From Chaplain Robert Thompson, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 May 1810:

 

        Certifies that Midshipman Horatio F. Marcellin has completed his course in celestial navigation on board.

 

From Thomas Salter, Elizabethtown, NJ, 22 May 1810:

 

        Requests his son, Midshipman William D. Salter, be ordered to serve under Captain Isaac Hull [soon to be in CONSTITUTION].  [So ordered.]

 

From Lieutenant Theodore Hunt, USS HORNET, 23 May 1810:

 

        Arrived at Annapolis in company with CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Samuel Woodhouse, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Jun 1810:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.  Reports he has already signed on a merchant voyage in the expectation of being granted a requested furlough.  Requests cancellation of orders.  [Cancelled.]

 

 From Midshipman Wolcott Chauncey, Annapolis, MD, 8 Jun 1810:

 

        Requests a furlough due to health.

 

Roll 8, Vol 15 (July 2 ‑ December 28, 1810)

 

From Midshipman William B. Hall, Hampton Roads, VA, 23 Jul 1810:

 

        Requests cancellation of furlough; has been invited to join CONSTITUTION by Captain Hull.  [Not granted.]

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, to SecNav, 23 Jul 1810:

 

        Received enclosed furlough request from CONSTITUTION yesterday.  Mr. [Lieutenant F. H.] Mitchell, now in New York, has been ill "for some time past."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, to Midshipman Stephen Wilson, 23 Jul 1810:

 

        Grants permission for him to stay ashore until his health improves.

 

From Thomas Y. Sprogell, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Sep 1810:

 

        Requests 3‑month furlough for his son, Midshipman Sylvanus Sprogell, in CONSTITUTION.  [Young Sprogell fell overboard and drowned, 26 Oct 1810.]

 

From Midshipman Nathaniel D. Nicholson, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Sep 1810:

 

        Requests transfer to USS ENTERPRIZE.  [Granted.]

 

From Surgeon Samuel R. Trevett, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Oct 1810:

 

        Leave request.

 

From Gunner William Taylor, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Dec 1810:

 

        Leave request.

 

From Gunner William Taylor, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Dec 1810:

 

        Again requests leave.

 

Vol 16 (January 1 ‑ May 31, 1811)

 

From Midshipman John Packett, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Feb 1811:

 

        Requests transfer after having been a second in a duel.

 

From Surgeon Samuel R.Trevett, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Feb 1811:

 

        Submits his resignation.

 

From Lieutenant Charles Morris, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, to Commodore John Rodgers, 7 Mar 1811:

 

        Submits a harbor survey report of New London, CT.

 

From Lieutenant Stephen Cassin, Philadelphia, PA, 23 May 1811:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of order of 21 May to open a rendezvous for seamen for CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Stephen Cassin, Philadelphia, PA, 28 May 1811:

 

        No seamen recruited yet; merchantmen are paying $20‑25 per month.

 

From Lieutenant Stephen Cassin, Philadelphia, PA, 31 May 1811:

 

        Only one seaman shipped to date.

 

Roll 9, Vol 17 (June 2 ‑ December 31, 1811)

 

From Lieutenant Stephen Cassin, Philadelphia, PA, 8 Jun 1811:

 

        HORNET has transferred needed seamen to CONSTITUTION; will recruit for HORNET.

 

From Midshipman James Reilly, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jun 1811:

 

        Requests settlement of pay question.

 

From Lieutenant Alexander S. Wadsworth, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Jun 1811:

 

        Responds to questions as to how Anthony Mitchell was shipped at New York.

 

From Surgeon's Mate Samuel Gilliland, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Jul 1811:

 

        Concerning promotion.  [Resigned in Jun 1812.]

 

From Midshipman S. Nelson Phelps, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jul 1811:

 

        Requests 2‑3 weeks leave in France if ship is there long enough.

 

From Midshipman Charles T. Stallings, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Aug 1811:

 

        Reports his return to health and requests permission to rejoin ship.

 

Vol 18 (January 1 ‑ May 31, 1812)

 

From Midshipman Frederick Gibbon, Richmond, VA, 28 Feb 1812:

 

        On leave from CONSTITUTION; requests orders to USS UNITED STATES.  [Granted.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate Samuel Gilliland, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Mar 1812:

 

        Demands promotion.

 

From Purser Isaac Garretson, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Mar 1812:

 

        Gives a statement of service; wishes reappointment as Purser.  [A 14 Mar 1812 letter from Captain Isaac Hull is enclosed.]

 

From Sailing Master H. Wilkinson, Gunboat 67, 19 Mar 1812:

 

        Have delivered goods offloaded from CONSTITUTION at Norfolk to the Washington Navy Yard; awaiting cargo for return trip.

 

From Surgeon Samuel R. Trevett, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Mar 1812:

 

        A letter of recommendation for Dr. [Surgeon's Mate] Charles Cotton.

 

From Sailing Master Nehemiah Drew, Wilmington, NC, 10 Apr 1812:

 

        Questions rumor he is to be ordered to CONSTITUTION.  [Not so.]

 

From Surgeon Thomas Ewell, Washington, DC, 11 Apr 1812:

 

        Notes the arrival of many CONSTITUTION sick in local hospital, with resultant overcrowding; offers to forego a year's pay if money can be used to improve the situation through the building of a proper facility.

 

From Midshipman Henry Olcott, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Apr 1812:

 

        Submits resignation.

 

Roll 10, Vol 19 (June 1 ‑ August 31, 1812)

 

From Midshipman Andrew Haslett, Washington Navy Yard, 5 Jun 1812:

 

        Requests cancellation of orders to CONSTITUTION and furlough due to bad health.  [Granted.]

 

From Lieutenant Stephen Cassin, Philadelphia, PA, to Midshipman Charles L. Springer, 18 Jun 1812:

 

        Proceed in schooner HAPPY RETURN, John Hand, master, to Washington and deliver men to CONSTITUTION.  Report to SecNav and learn his pleasure.

        N.B.  At the mouth of the Potomac, call at St. Mary's to learn whether the ship is in the river or at Annapolis.

 

From Chaplain Andrew Hunter, Washington Navy Yard, 19 Jun 1812:

 

        Four or five "very illiterate" midshipmen have been set ashore from CONSTITUTION, "by your order I presume."  What is to be done with them?  "Forrest and Snelson are among the above."

 

From Lieutenant Charles Morris, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jun 1812:

 

        Requests transfer.

 

From Chaplain John Cook, New York, NY, 28 Jun 1812:

 

        Arrived in New York per orders on the 20th.  No word of CONSTITUTION.  Appalled at man's tarring and feathering in the Navy Yard.

 

From Midshipman George Getz, New York, New York, 17 Jul 1812:

 

        Desires orders to PRESIDENT, HORNET, CONSTITUTION, or ARGUS, all of whom are expected at the city.

 

From Lieutenant Oliver H. Perry, Newport, RI, 24 Jul 1812:

 

        Captain Mabury of brig RISING SUN says "when he left Constitution she was standing to the Eastd. under easy sail."

 

From Lieutenant Oliver H. Perry, Newport, RI, 26 Jul 1812:

 

        Reports being told of capture of USS NAUTILUS "off the high lands...by the English" on the 16th by merchant Captain Blunt, former master of a vessel also taken by the English.  NAUTILUS sent to Halifax.  "The masters of the vessels arrived here bear testimony to the excellence of the conduct of Capt. Hull of the Constitution, who by the account not only out sailed the British squadron, but out maneuvered them & he was so near as to throw shot over the Belvidera and Guerrier [sic] neither of which dare approach him without the whole squadron.  On taking a breeze he sailed them out of sight in a short time."

        The British squadron had taken 14 merchantmen.  One, brig DISPATCH of New Haven, was sent in with 155 captured American seamen.

 

From Lieutenant Charles Morris, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Aug 1812:

 

        Arthur O. Tone was shipped for PRESIDENT, turned over to CONSTITUTION, and discharged in July 1811 "by your order."  He said nothing about his "connexions."  When I was in Paris, I saw Mrs. Tone, widow of the celebrated Theo W. Tone.  I learned he had escaped from his English prison and come to America, "lost" to his friends.  His conduct was correct while in the ships.  He went to Washington upon discharge.  [A "sea story."  Theobald Wolfe Tone, the Irish revolutionary of the 1790s, committed suicide with a pen knife in 1798: Encyc. Brit.]

 

From Doctor Charles Cotton, 2 Aug 1812:

 

        Requests duty in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Chaplain John Cook, New York, NY, 14 Aug 1812:

 

        Still awaiting CONSTITUTION and in need of funds.  What to do?

 

Vol 20 (September 1 ‑ December 31, 1812)

 

From Midshipman William D. McCarty, New York, NY, 2 Sep 1812:

 

        I learned from an officer of CONSTITUTION who arrived here this morning of her success.  Request permission to proceed to join her in Boston.

 

From Chaplain John Cook, New York, NY, 2 Sep 1812:

 

        Learned of CONSTITUTION's success from one of her officers who arrived here this morning.  What do you want me to do?  I need money to travel.

 

From Midshipman Thomas Holdup, USS JOHN ADAMS, 3 Sep 1812:

 

        Request transfer to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant William B. Shubrick, USS HORNET, 6 Sep 1812:

 

        Request transfer to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Charles Morris, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Sep 1812:

 

        Leave request [to recover from abdominal wound suffered in battle with HMS GUERRIERE].

 

From Surgeon's Mate John D. Armstrong, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Sep 1812:

 

        Requests transfer to the Boston Navy Yard.  [Endorsed by Surgeon Amos Evans.]

 

From Midshipman Z. W. Nixon, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Oct 1812:

 

        Reports his arrival on board on 25 Sep 1812.

 

From Midshipman John Packett, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Oct 1812:

 

        Reports his arrival on board on 16 Oct 1812.

 

From Midshipman George W. Storer, New York, NY, 29 Oct 1812:

 

        Sailed in PRESIDENT and CONSTITUTION with Captain [Charles] Morris.  Request orders to USS ADAMS.

 

From Midshipman Silas N. Phelps, "Porthampton," VA, 14 Nov 1812:

 

        I presume you knew Capt. Hull left me here sick after CONSTITUTION returned from Europe.  Was still sick in July when CONSTITUTION passed out to sea.  Got discharged from the ship with orders to report to you when fit for duty.  Came to this place "the last of July."  Was nearly recovered when hit with bilious fever.  Believed well enough now to request orders.

 

Roll 11, Vol 21 (January 2 ‑ April 30, 1813)

 

 From Sailing Master James P. Oellers, Boston, MA, 24 Feb 1813:

 

        "...there are no vacancies on board...Constitution..."

 

From Midshipman Joel Abbot [sic], 19 Mar 1813:

 

        Requests duty in CONSTITUTION.

 

Vol 22 (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1813)

 

From Midshipman William Taylor, Petersburg, VA, 7 May 1813:

 

        Furlough began 24 March, now done.  "Not having as yet received my prize money for the Guerriere and Java Frigates..."

 

From Surgeon's Mate Charles Cotton, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 May 1813:

 

        Reported aboard 11 Apr 1813.

 

From Midshipman Thomas Crabb, USS CONSTELLATION, 22 May 1813:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Samuel Bullus, USS ALERT, 25 May 1813:

 

        In Navy since January 1809.  With Commodore Rodgers in CONSTITUTION and PRESIDENT "two years" until furloughed in April 1811.  Wants orders to the Lakes.  [Granted, as Acting Lieutenant.]

 

From "1st" Surgeon's Mate John D. Armstrong, USS CONSTITUTION, 31 May 1813:

 

        Was born in Ireland and has been in US 8 years.  Has been in two actions with the USN against the RN.  Wants shore duty.

 

From Purser E. W. Turner, USS ENTERPRIZE, 23 Jun 1813:

 

        Volunteers to fill CONSTITUTION's reported need for a Purser.  [No.]

 

Roll 12, Vol 23 (July 1 ‑ September 30, 1813)

 

From Midshipman Thomas N. Bonneville, USS ALERT, 7 Jul 1813:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

 From Midshipman Silas N. Phelps, Northampton, VA, ? Jul 1813:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or MACEDONIAN.  Now healthy.

 

From Lieutenant William B. Shubrick, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jul 1813:

 

        "...particularly anxious to join Constitution..."  [Annotated: see if Stewart wants him.  He did.]

 

From Lieutenant Charles Ridgely, 24 Jul 1813:

 

        Requests duty in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Surgeon's Mate Benjamin Austin, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Aug 1813:

 

        Reporting for duty in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Dr. Richard C. Gregory, USS CONSTELLATION, 1 Sep 1813:

 

        Wishes orders to accompany Surgeon William Turk from CONSTELLATION to CONSTITUTION as his Surgeon's Mate.  Has been Acting Surgeon's Mate in CONSTELLATION for 2 years.  [Annotated: nominate him to Senate as Surgeon's Mate.]

 

From Midshipman Lewis E. Simonds, 2 Sep 1813:

 

        Requests duty in CONSTITUTION, from furlough.

 

From Dr. Richard C. Gregory, USS CONSTELLATION, 8 Sep 1813:

 

        Surgeon Turk "has just departed" for CONSTITUTION.  Again requests orders.  [Not granted.]

 

Vol 24 (October 1 ‑ December 30, 1813)

 

From Midshipman Frederick Varnum, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Oct 1813:

 

        Has been in CONSTITUTION since Apr 1813; now indisposed; will carry out orders to join SIREN when better.

 

From Surgeon William Turk, Providence, RI, 11 Oct 1813:

 

        Has joined PRESIDENT, replacing Surgeon Robert L. Thorn, as Dr. Cotten has remained in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Surgeon's Mate John D. Armstrong, USS CONSTITUTION,  20 Oct 1813:

 

        Requests shore duty.  [Annotated: no place for him now.]

 

From Acting Sailing Master Samuel Cooper, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Nov 1813:

 

        A recent member of CHESAPEAKE's defeated crew, he is concerned that he was properly exchanged and now eligible to serve again.

 

From Acting Surgeon's Mate Artemas Johnson, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Nov 1813:

 

        Has been on board since 8 Aug 1813.

 

From Surgeon's Mate John D. Armstrong, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Dec 1813:

 

        As someone born in Ireland and not yet an American citizen, he wishes shore duty to avoid capture by the British.  [Annotated with the fact that he has a friend in Congress.]

 

Roll 13, Vol 25 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1814)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 26 (April 1 ‑ June 30, 1814)

 

From Midshipman William R. F. Chamberlain, Boston Navy Yard, 21 Apr 1814:

 

        Requests duty in CONSTITUTION as "there is now a vacancy".  [Sent to the Great Lakes instead.]

 

From Lieutenant William M. Hunter, Philadelphia, PA, 27 Apr 1814:

 

        Was granted leave by Captain Stewart upon death of his father.  Requests leave be extended another 2 weeks to settle his affairs.  [Approved to 11 May, then return to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Lieutenant Henry E. Ballard, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 May 1814:

 

        Requests leave [granted]; also would like duty with Commodore Bainbridge in INDEPENDENCE [not granted].

 

From Midshipman John C. Long, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 May 1814:

 

        Has been on sea duty "about 18 mos."; wants orders to Portsmouth (NH) Navy Yard.

 

From Surgeon Charles Cotton, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 May 1814:

 

        Reports that Doctor John A. Kearney at Newport News wants to exchange duties; Cotton does, too, for health reasons.  [Granted.]

 

From Surgeon John A. Kearney, Newport, RI, 26 May 1814:

 

        Also reports on proposed exchange.

 

Vol 27 (July 1 ‑ October 31, 1814)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 28 (November 2 ‑ December 31, 1814)

 

From Sailing Master Samuel C. Hixon, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Nov 1814:

 

        Has sailed with Captain Stewart for 16 months; requests command of one of small (harassing) vessels the Navy is rumored to be considering if CONSTITUTION is not to be ordered to sea.

 

From Midshipman James Greenlaw, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Nov 1814:

 

        Has been in CONSTITUTION throughout the war; if she remains blockaded, wants to leave to join a privateer.  [Approved if Captain Stewart will agree.]

 

From Midshipman John M. Channing, Exeter, NH, 16 Nov 1814:

 

        Requests orders to CONGRESS or CONSTITUTION.  Was wounded while in PRESIDENT.

 

Roll 14, Vol 29 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1815)

 

From Surgeon's Mate Archimedes Smith, Lexington, KY, 29 Jan 1815:

 

        Wishes orders to CONSTITUTION under Captain Sinclair, lately appointed, when his health is regained.  [Ordered to USS NIAGARA.]

 

Vol 30 (March 1 ‑ April 30, 1815)

 

From Lieutenant Beekman V. Hoffman, New York, NY, 10 Apr 1815:

 

        Reports his arrival with CONSTITUTION's prize, HMS CYANE.

 

From Lieutenant Beekman V. Hoffman, New York, NY, 10 Apr 1815 [2nd ltr]:

 

        "I have the favor to inform you, that. on the morning of the 20th of February last, while Cruising off Madeira the United States Frigate Constitution fell iin with his Britanic [sic] Majestys Ships Cyane and Levant, which she captured after and Action of 50 minutes.—

        "The Cyane is a Frigate built Ship, mounting 34 Carriage Guns (vizt.) 22, 32 lb Carronades on the Main Deck, 8 18 lb Carronades on the Quarter Deck 2 18 lb Carronades and 2 long nines on the Forecastle, andfrom the best information I could obtain carrying a Complement of 175 Men Commanded by Gordon Falcon Esqr.  The Levant mounting 21 Carriage Guns (vizt.) 18 24 lb Carronades 2 long nines and a shifting 12 pounder on the Topgallant Forecastle with a Complement of 158 Men Commanded by the Honble George Douglas.  Both Ships suffered severely in their Spars Rigging and Sails.--  The Constitution received but trifling Injury.--  having only 4 men killed and 10 wounded.  As to the loss of the Enemy I cannot possibly ascertain, but should presume it was very severe.—

        "On the 9th of March the Constitution with her two Prizes in Company, anchored off the Isle of May - (one of the Cape De Verd Islands).  On the 10th at 5 AM Got underway and made Sail for St. Iago's where we anchored at 10.45 AM.-  On the 12th at 1/2 past Meridian discovered 3 Sail in the offing.  At 1.10 made them to be Frigates.- at which time the Constitution made Signal to get Underway.-  At 1.20 Cut our cable and made Sail to  the Southward and Eastward close on a wind.--  At 1.30 the Forts on Shore commenced Firing on us.-  At 2 the Constitution made Signal to Tack, which I did to the Northwd and Westward-  At 2.5 the Sternmost Frigate commenced Firing on us, and hoisted English Colours, distance about two miles.  At 2.20 lost sight of the Constitution and Levant, who were standing on a Wind to the Southward and Eastward,.  The Frigates in Chase.--  At 2.35 lost sight of the enemy.  At 3 heard a heavy Cannonading, which continued at intervals until 1/2 past 4.-  At Sundown Shaped my course for the United States.--  For the further particulars of Course, I beg to refer you to Captaini Stewarts official account on his arrival to the United States.

        "I cannot conclude my Letter without particularly recommending to your Notice Midshipamn Joseph Cross, for whose unremitted Attention and Exertions I feel myself greatly indebted, and he is a young Man who I think wouold do honorto a Commission.

        "And to Midshipman James Delany, and James Curtis.- and the few Men I have under my Command words would be insufficient to express my gratitude towards them."

 

[Note: The annotation on the outside of the letter terms Cyane a "Sloop of War."]

 

Vol 31 (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1815)

 

From Lieutenant Henry E. Ballard, Baltimore, MD, 2 May 1815:

 

        "I have the honour to make known to you my arrival at this place with a part of the Officers and crew of the U.S. frigate Constitution, captured in a prize, the Levant, in the harbour of Porto Praya in the island of St. Iago, by a Squadron of His Brittannic Majesty's Ships, consisting of the Leander Sir George Collier, the Newcastle, Lord George Stewart, and the Acasta Capt. Kerr;- for the particulars of my recapture I beg leave to refer you to the enclosed extract from the Log Book of the Levant.

        "Having caused the destruction of my own papers as well as those of the Officers with me, I can only say to  you relative to  the Constitution that after leaving the Port of Boston she Severally cruised off the islands of Bermuda and Madeira, in the Bay of Biscay, and for some time in sight of the Rock of Lisbon, without having met with but two of the Enemy's vessels, one of which was destroyed the other ordered in; and that, on the evening of the 20th February, the island of Madeira bearing WSW distant 70 leagues, fell in with, engaged, and after a close action of 40 minutes captured H.B. Majestys Ships Cyane Capt. Gordon Falcon, and Levant Honble Captain Douglass.

        "It would, Sir be deemed presumption in me to attempt to give you particular details, respectinig the nature of this action I shall therefore, only remark generally that every Officer, seaman and marine on board did their duty.  I canot, however, deny myself the pleasure that this opportunity affords me of noticing the brilliant management of Captaini Charles Stewart, through whose unerring judgment every attempt of an ingenious Enemy to gain a raking position was frustrated.

 

[Enclosures}

 

The Cyane mounted on her Main deck twenty two 32 lb Carronades on her Upper deck, ten 18 lb Carronades, two long 9s, and one 12 lb. Carronade on a traveling carriage, with a complement of 175 men. The Levant mounted eighteen 32 lb. Carronades, two long 9s. and one 12 lb. Carronade, with 138

men.

                                "The Constitution had 4 killed and 9 wounded

                                        Cyane                7 killed        17 wounded

                                        Levant                9 killed        17 wounded"

 

"Extract from the Log Book of Ship Levant.

Harbour of Porto Praya, Saturday, March 11. 1815.  These twenty four hours commence with moderate breezes and thick hazy weather.  All hands employed in refitting ship the topgallant yards on deck and sials unbent to repair.  At 0h. 25m. P.M. discovered three large ships bearing S.W. by W. distant four or five miles. - Wind N.E. - Signal from Constitution to get under weigh - Cut and made Sail in a wind on the larboard tack, crossed topgallant and main royal yards and set sails.  At 1h. the enemy evidently falling astern and to leeward of the Constitution, but gaining fast on the Cyane and Levant -- 1.30 Cyane tacked by signal from the Constitution.-  at 2 lost sight of Cyane - at 2.30 the headmost ship, the New Castle, four points on oour lee bow distant 3 miles the Acasta two points on the lee bow distant 2 miles, and the Leander on the lee quarter 2 1/2 miles distant; tacked by Signal from the Constitution, the enemy's squadron immediately tacking in chase.  At 3 lost sight of the Constitution, Same tim made the high land to the S.E. of the harbour -- At 3.30 finding it impossible to escape by keeping by the wind from our very great inferiority of sailing, the Acasta having gained to windward of our wake and the other ships neared us very much, it was determined to bear up for the harbour, distant 4 or 5 miles on the lee bow, the neutrality of which we were all under the strongest belief the enemy would not violate -- 3.35 kept away one point and Set the Staysails, when  the leander, Sir George Collier, opened her fire, the shot passing over us and falling on  the neutral shore.  At 3.50 the Newcastle Lord George Stewart, and Acasta Captain Kerr, opened their fire upon us cutting away much of our rigging and upper sails, which circumstance gave them the advantage of keeping off and luffing too so as to bring their broadsides to bear without materially altering their position.  At 4 snchored in four fathomos water within 150 yards of the shore and under a very st[rong/] battery.  At 4.5 the Acasta took a position on our quarter distance half a cable length, from which she kept up a constant fire from her bow guns.  Finding that the enemy, regardless of our Situation, [obscured] their fire from all their ships, the officers were called together, when it was determined that longer to receive their fire without being able to return a single gun was only to expose the lives of men rendered valuable to their country, both by their long and faithful service and by their recent exploits.  At 4.15 the colours were hauled down, notwithstanding which the Leander and Newcastle both passed near, wore ship, and in waring [sic] wantonly fired their broadsides into us, the Acasta Captain Kerr stll keeping up his fire from his bow guns until the volours were hoisted half up and hauled down again as a signal that we had Surrendered.  At 4.30 a Boat with and Officer from the Acasta came on board and said he was ordered to take charge of the Ship in his Majesty's name.  On Lt Ballards remonstrating at their firing after he had struck, the reply was that they had only obeyed the Signal of their Commodore.  During the time of our approach to the harbour, as well as when getting under way previously from it, we were fired upon from a battery which the prisoners whom we had landed in the morning had taken possession of, and from which we understand the Pportuguese [made] no exertions to dislodge them; although very many of their shot fired by the Squadron, passed over or through us and fell into their town, several of them passing through the houses comprising the residence of the Governor."

 

From Lieutenant Beekman V. Hoffman, USS CYANE, 8 May 1815:

 

        Having seen Ballard's letter, above, corrects the statement in his 10 Apr letter that LEVANT was armed with 24 pdr carronades.  Says his misinformation came from Midshipman Joseph Cross, who had been in that ship for the first days after her capture,               

 

From Lieutenant Beekman V. Hoffman, New York, NY, 10 May 1815:

 

        CYANE condemned yesterday as lawful prize.  Is the Government to purchase her?  Desires to continue in command.

 

From Surgeon's Mate Artemas Johnson, 17 May 1815:

 

        Was serving in CONSTITUTION and later taken prisoner while a member of the LEVANT prize crew, returned to Baltimore on 2 May; wants to rejoin CONSTITUTION and Captain Stewart wants him.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant N. L. Montgomery, 22 May 1815:

 

        Requests duty in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Shubael Pratt, Midfield, NY, 3 Jun 1815:

 

        Dr. "Carney" [Kearney] of my ship, CONSTITUTION, has ordered me ashore for my health.

 

From Master's Mate Nathaniel G. Leighton, 6 Jun 1815:

 

        Says he sailed "five years" with "Capt Stewart & Mr. Ballard...as well as Commodore Bainbridge"; lost his orders as Acting Sailing Master in LEVANT; wants reconfirmation of the position.

 

From Surgeon's Mate Benjamin Austin, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Jun 1815:

 

        Has been in CONSTITUTION for two cruises; requests leave.

 

From Midshipman Horace B. Sawyer, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Jun 1815:

 

        Requests leave.

 

From Sailing Master Samuel C. Hixon, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jun 1815:

 

        Requests leave.

 

From Midshipman James Greenlaw, New York, NY, 10 Jun 1815:

 

        Got furlough on 15 Nov 1814 to go in privateer PRINCE DE NEUFCHATEL as 2nd officer.  Captured by Sir George Collier's squadron shortly after sailing in Dec and sent to England.  Was attached to CONSTITUTION from 23 Jun 1812 until furloughed.  Had had 5 years merchant service ‑‑ 2 as an officer ‑‑ before that.  Now returned.  [Had been held at Dartmoor in England and witnessed shooting of helpless prisoners.]  [Sent the letter again on 21 June.]  [Ordered to USS BOXER.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate Benjamin Austin, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Jun 1815:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of furlough permission.

 

From Lieutenant George W. Rodgers, USS FIREFLY, 26 Jun 1815:

 

        Reports finding Ely Mason, a deserter from CONSTITUTION, in his crew.  On CONSTITUTION, known as Ebenezer Aleby [Alaby].  Had shipped for JAVA, but sent here with Commodore Decatur's consent.  Orders?  [Court martial at New York.]

 

Roll 15, Vol 32 (July 1 ‑ September 30, 1815)

 

From Lieutenant George W. Rodgers, New York Navy Yard, 5 Jul 1815:

 

        Ely Mason, alias Ebenezer Abely, although in double irons and under a sentinel's charge, slipped the irons and escaped "the night before last."  Search organized; sentinel confined.

 

From Midshipmen Z. W. Nixon, John A. Wish, Alexander Eskridge, and William Steele, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 Jul 1815:

 

        All desire furloughs to make merchant voyages to England.

 

From Midshipman A. W. Lufborough, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Jul 1815:

 

        Requests furlough to visit family.

 

From Midshipman James H. Dobbins, Philadelphia, PA, 13 Jul 1815:

 

        Having had a furlough approved before receiving orders to CONSTITUTION, having made arrangements to go on a merchant voyage, and understanding that CONSTITUTION "will undergo considerable repairs," will keep the furlough and return the orders.  [Orders were dated 21 Jun.]

 

From Lieutenant George W. Rodgers, New York Navy Yard, 15 Jul 1815:

 

        Mason not yet apprehended.  Cannot prove sentinel helped him, although it seems likely.  Will be taking FIREFLY to sea shortly.

 

From Midshipman Z. W. Nixon, USS CONSTITUTION, 31 Jul 1815:

 

        Requests 1 year furlough.  [Ordered to USS UNITED STATES.]

 

From Midshipman Thomas H. Bouyer, Boston, MA, 11 Aug 1815:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to USS WASHINGTON.]

 

From Midshipman Daniel Goodwin, Biddeford, MA [ME], 18 Aug 1815:

 

        Requests orders to WASHINGTON or CONSTITUTION, or a furlough.

 

From Lieutenant T. W. Magruder, USS UNITED STATES, 22 Aug 1815:

 

        "For the last three months I have been attached to the Constitution...;" recently transferred to UNITED STATES.  Needs his new commission to settle seniority with "Lt. McCulloch."

 

From Midshipman James K. Vallette, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Sep 1815:

 

        Request transfer to USS FRANKLIN.  [Transferred to USS WASHINGTON.]

 

From Midshipman James W. Delany, Boston, MA, 9 Sep 1815:

 

        Received orders dated 8 Sep from Commodore [Isaac] Hull to report to SecNav for orders.  "...I have been the whole war in Constitution and no prospect of her going to sea..."  Requests furlough.  [1 year furlough granted.]

 

From Purser Alexander P. Darragh, Christiana, DE, 28 Sep 1815:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

Vol 33 (October 1 ‑ December 31, 1815)

 

From Lieutenant Beekman V. Hoffman, New York Navy Yard, 2 Oct 1815:

 

        Lieutenant German "...is a young Gentleman who has sailed with me in the Constitution and I know him to be an excellent Officer & Seaman, and would be very happy to have him as my 1st Lieut..."  Lieutenant German lately returned from the late brig SIREN.  [Hoffman commanding USS TOM BOWLINE.  German ordered to Sackett's Harbor.]

 

From Midshipman Alexander Eskridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Dec 1815:

 

        Requests a furlough for a merchant voyage.

 

Vol 34 (July 6, 1815 ‑ December 29, 1815)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 16, Vol 34 [sic] (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1816)

 

From Lieutenant William B. Shubrick, Charleston, SC, 14 Jan 1816:

 

        Seeks support for the 10 month‑old son, Edmund Templer Shubrick, of his deceased brother, John Templer Shubrick [lost in USS EPERVIER].  Suggests pay and emoluments of a midshipman, as was done for Captain Lawrence's son.  [Not done.  Edmund T. Shubrick appointed Midshipman 22 Jun 1829.]

 

From Midshipman Thomas B. Tilden, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Mar 1815 [sic: 1816]:

 

        Requests orders to USS MACEDONIAN.  [Annotated: Commodore Bainbridge will order such officers on board INDEPENDENCE as he thinks proper.]

 

From Purser A. Y. Humphreys, Boston, MA, 18 May 1816:

 

        Last August 17th received orders from Commodore Hull to report to USS PROMETHEUS [from CONSTITUTION] as Acting Purser.  Today, received orders from Commodore Bainbridge to report to Commodore Chauncey as Acting Chaplain in  WASHINGTON.  Does the latest appointment supercede the former?  [Humphreys had been Acting Chaplain in CONSTITUTION, but had secured a commission as Purser (as of Jun 1815).  He was not reverted.]

 

Vol 35 (April 1 ‑ June 30, 1816)

 

From Midshipman Lewis E. Simonds, Boston, MA, 15 Jun 1816:

 

        Was sentenced to 1 year suspension on charges brought by Lieutenant G. W. Storer in INDEPENDENCE in court martial held in CONSTITUTION on 15 Jun 1815.  Suspension ends today; requests orders.  [Ordered to USS PROMETHEUS on 31 Jul.]

 

Roll 17, Vol 36 (July 1 ‑ September 30, 1816)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 37 (October 1 ‑ December 31, 1816)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 18, Vol 38 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1817)

 

From Sailing Master Samuel C. Hixon, Boston, MA, 3 Mar 1817:

 

        "...I served in Constitution under Captain Stewart..."  "...after our return from the first cruise in April 1814..."

 

Vol 39 (April 1 ‑ May 30, 1817)

 

From Sailing Master Samuel Casper Hixon, Boston, MA, 14 Apr 1817:

 

        Requests orders to USS MACEDONIAN.  Made "two last cruises in the Constitution..."  Needs employment to support family.  [Annotated: granted.]

 

Vol 40 (June 1 ‑ July 31, 1817)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 19, Vol 41 (August 1 ‑ September 30, 1817)

 

From Midshipman Archibald M. Stewart, Washington, DC, 18 Sep 1817:

 

        Has been on furlough in the merchant service since Sep 1815.  Not knowing he was supposed to report himself semi‑annually, has returned to find his name no longer listed.  Wishes reinstatement.

 

Vol 42 (October 1 ‑ December 31, 1817)

 

From Midshipman Adam S. Kuhn, USS DESPATCH, 29 Dec 1817:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or HORNET, which ships he understands will be the next to get sailing orders.

 

Roll 20, Vol 43 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1818)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 44 (April 1 ‑ May 29, 1818)

 

From Boatswain James Wolf, New York, NY, 2 Apr 1818:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or CONSTELLATION.  [He didn't get CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Lieutenant H. B. Sawyer, USS INDEPENDENCE, 18 Apr 1818:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION if she is going to sea.  [No.]

 

Vol 45 (June 1 ‑ July 31, 1818)

 

From Midshipman Thomas B. Tilden, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jan 1816 [sic]:

 

        Requests orders to USS WASHINGTON.

 

From Lieutenant William H. Allen, Baltimore, MD, 25 Jul 1818:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or CONGRESS.  [Not to CONSTITUTION.]

 

Roll 21, Vol 46 (August 1 ‑ September 30, 1818)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 47 (October 1 ‑ December 31, 1818)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 22, Vol 48 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1819)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 49 (March 1 ‑ April 29, 1819)

 

        NOTHING

 

 Vol 50 (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1819)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 23, Vol 51 (July 1 ‑ September 30, 1819)

 

From Boatswain James Wolf, Philadelphia, PA, 23 Sep 1819:

 

        Has been in merchant service since leaving CONSTITUTION "which it a little better than a year," and wishes active service.  [Not on ship's muster rolls.  Evidently a shipkeeper while she was in ordinary.]

 

Vol 52 (October 1 ‑ December 31, 1819)

 

From Lieutenant Nathaniel Lawrence Montgomery, New York, NY, 6 Oct 1819:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or the Boston Station.  [Ordered to the Station.]

 

From Lieutenant William Berry, Washington, DC, 18 Oct 1819:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

Vol 53 (January 1 ‑ March 30, 1820)

 

From Lieutenant John T. Newton, USS HORNET, 20 Mar 1820:

 

        Has learned that "Lieutenant Parker" has been ordered to CONSTITUTION from the New York Navy Yard and wishes to be his successor at the yard.  [This may have been Lieutenant Foxhall Alexander Parker, Sr.  So ordered.]

 

Roll 24, Vol 54 (April 1 ‑ May 30, 1820)

 

From Lieutenant Otho Stallings, Baltimore, MD, 11 Apr 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or any other vessel fitting for sea.  [Ordered to CONSTELLATION.]

 

Vol 55 (June 1 ‑ August 30, 1820)

 

From Purser Thomas Breese, Boston, MA, 5 Jun 1820:

 

        Returns orders issued erroneously on 14 Dec 1818 that attached him to CONSTITUTION on the misunderstanding that he was not on active duty.

 

From Lieutenant Dulany Forrest, Washington, DC, 14 Jun 1820:

 

        Requests orders to "join my old ship," CONSTITUTION.

 

From Surgeon George S. Sproston, Norfolk, VA, 1 Jul 1820:

 

        Has received orders to CONSTITUTION in Boston and wishes to receive a travel allowance.

 

From Midshipman Timothy Gay, Boston, MA, 25 Aug 1820:

 

        Request orders to CONSTITUTION or any ship going to sea.

 

From Acting Midshipman Lewis Seeger, Boston, MA, 26 Jul 1820:

 

        Requests orders to INDEPENDENCE now and transfer to CONSTITUTION when her officers are assigned.  [Ordered to INDEPENDENCE, but not CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Lieutenant L. E. Simonds, Boston, MA, 26 Jul 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Roger C. Shaw, USS ALERT, 27 Jul 1820:

 

        Requests transfer to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Charles W. Minchin, USS ALERT, 27 Jul 1820:

 

        Requests transfer to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Acting Midshipman Lewis R. M. Morse, Boston, MA, 14 Aug 1820:

 

        Requests orders to INDEPENDENCE or CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to INDEPENDENCE.]

 

From Midshipman Timothy Gay, Boston, MA, 17 Aug 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or any ship going to sea.  [Ordered to INDEPENDENCE.]

 

From Midshipman Samuel Gaillard, New York, NY, 19 Aug 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman John Pope, USS OHIO, 24 Aug 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Transferred to ENTERPRIZE.]

 

From Lieutenant L. E. Simonds, Boston, MA, 26 Aug 1820:

 

        Repeats request for orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman G. W. Bleeker, USS WASHINGTON, 28 Aug 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

Roll 25, Vol 56 (September 2 ‑ October 31, 1820)

 

From Midshipman George W. Bleeker, USS WASHINGTON, 7 Sep 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman John Pope, USS OHIO, 15 Sep 1820:

 

        Distressed to learn he has been ordered to ENTERPRIZE rather than ONTARIO or CONSTITUTION.

 

From Chaplain Addison Searle, 24 Sep 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman George W. Bleeker, USS WASHINGTON, 23 Oct 1820:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant William Boerum, Washington, DC, 26 Oct 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

Vol 57 (November 1 ‑ December 31, 1820)

 

From Midshipman Isaac H. Rand, Boston, MA, 7 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION instead of ONTARIO.

 

From Lieutenant James F. Curtis, USS INDEPENDENCE, 8 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION instead of ALLIGATOR.

 

From Midshipman Henry John Auchmuty, USS INDEPENDENCE, 8 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain R. D. Wainwright, USMC, Boston, MA, 3 Feb 1821:

 

        Urges Midshipman Auchmuty's 8 Nov 1820 request for orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Thomas A. Conover, USS FRANKLIN, 10 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He got them in 1849.]

 

From Lieutenant Frank Ellery, Newport, RI, 10 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He got them in 1822.]

 

From Captain John Orde Creighton, Newport, RI, 10 Nov 1820:

 

        Endorses Lieutenant Ellery's request of this date.

 

From Lieutenant James A. Perry, New York, NY, 13 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Richard Barker, Portsmouth NY, NH, 16 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Joseph Cassin, Jr., Norfolk, VA, 14 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to ADAMS.]

 

From Midshipman George W. Bleeker, New York, NY, 18 Nov 1820:

 

        Yet again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Lieutenant William H. Cocke, Norfolk, VA, 18 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Thomas B. Worthington, Georgetown, DC, 21 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant Frederick Varnum, USS INDEPENDENCE, 24 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Eventually ordered to ALLIGATOR.]

 

From Midshipman U. C. Purveyance, Baltimore, MD, 24 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests restoration to duty and orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant James F. Curtis, Washington, DC, 25 Nov 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to PORPOISE.]

 

From Midshipman Edmond M. Russell, USS INDEPENDENCE, 25 Nov 1820:

 

        Having failed the recent examination for Lieutenant, requests orders to CONSTITUTION in order to improve himself.

 

From Midshipman Jott S. Paine, USS INDEPENDENCE, 8 Dec 1820:

 

        Having passed the recent examination for Lieutenant, requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Edward S. Lewis, USS WASHINGTON, 4 Dec 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant William Boerum, New York, NY, 4 Dec 1820:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman William P. Piercy, Washington NY, DC, 7 Dec 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to SHARK.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate George Terrill, Norfolk, VA, 11 Dec 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to PORPOISE.]

 

From Midshipman John M. Sullivan, New York, NY, 14 Dec 1820:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

Vol 58 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1821)

 

From Chaplain Addison Searle, Boston, MA, 12 Jan 1821:

 

        Requests leave until CONSTITUTION is manned.  [Granted.]

 

From Midshipman Thomas M. Randolph, Milton, MA, 14 Jan 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to HORNET.]

 

From Midshipman James Bradford, Washington, DC, 19 Jan 1821:

 

        Requests orders to active service.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Lieutenant Frederick P. Wolbert, Jr., Philadelphia, PA, 20 Jan 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to PORPOISE.]

 

From Midshipman Richard A. Jones, Head of Sassafras, MD, 2 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman T. H. Saul, USS WASHINGTON, 7 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Acting Midshipman John W. Mooers, USS WASHINGTON, 8 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done in 1824.]

 

From Midshipman John Hamilton, USS CYANE, 10 FEB 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Francis B. Ellison, USS WASHINGTON, 10 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant Benjamin Cooper, USS CYANE, 10 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done in 1828.]

 

From Lieutenant Samuel L. Breese, USS HORNET, 17 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Boatswain James Banks, USS FRANKLIN, 19 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon Peter St. Medard, Boston, MA, 19 Feb 1821:

 

        Entered service in the Continental Navy in 1779, about a year after arriving in the United States and 6 months in the "so called" prison ship JERSEY at New York, and was ordered to duty in PROVIDENCE (Capt Whipple).  In November 1779, was ordered to DEAN [sic] (Captain S. Nicholson) at Boston.  On 24 Oct 1781, was warranted as Surgeon (Surgeons not then being commissioned).  In 1782, DEAN became HOGUE, and John Manley succeeded Nicholson.  Discharged in mass demobilization of the Continental Navy in 1784.  Reported on board CONSTITUTION in 1798 at the request of Captain Nicholson.  On 14 Jul 1799, 7 months later, his status was confirmed by the issuance of a commission.

 

From Lieutenant Samuel L. Breese, USS HORNET, 21 Feb 1821:

 

        Elaborates on his earlier request for orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman John Marston, Jr., Philadelphia, PA, 26 Feb 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Isaac H. Rand, Boston, MA, 28 Feb 1821:

 

        Repeats his request for orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 26, Vol 59 (March 1 ‑ April 30, 1821)

 

From Midshipman Arthur Lewis, USS JOHN ADAMS, 4 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Surgeon Usher Parsons, Boston, MA, 4 Mar 1821:

 

        Asks not to be ordered to CONSTITUTION as his "liver complaint has returned" and he fears a voyage to the Mediterranean would prove fatal.

 

From Midshipman Samuel F. Dupont, Wilmingtom, DE, 6 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Lucius D. Heylin, Philadelphia, PA, 7 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant Ralph Voorhees, USS CYANE, 9 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Got there in 1826.]

 

From Gunner William Johnson, USS ALERT, 10 MAR 1821:

 

        For the fourth time, requests orders to CONSTITUTION or the Boston Station.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant Isaac McKeever, Washington, DC, 10 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION as a supernumerary, if in no other capacity.  [Done; he paid his own way to Boston.]

 

From Francis H. Ellison, New York NY, 12 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests that his son, Midshipman Francis B. Ellison, be ordered to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Edmond M. Russell, USS INDEPENDENCE, 12 mAR 1821:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate T. V. Wiesenthal, USS ALLIGATOR, 13 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests transfer to CONSTITUTION.  [Apparently suffers from chronic seasickness.]

 

From Midshipman Archibald R. Bogardus, USS CYANE, 21 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon John H. Gordon, Philadelphia, PA, 22 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests revocation of orders to CONSTITUTION as he is still recovering from a severe attack of inflammatory rheumatism.

 

From Lieutenant James P. Oellers, Philadelphia, PA, 22 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Henry Bruce, USS INDEPENDENCE, 26 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Harrison H. Cocke, New York, NY, 28 Mar 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ship full.]

 

From Surgeon Alexander A. Evans, Elkton, MD, 29 Mar 1821:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to report for duty in CONSTITUTION.  After 9 years of arduous service and no shore duty, even when juniors were getting it (and with the privilege of private practice), on the advice of Captain Hull and Commodore Bainbridge secured a furlough and set about investigating the establishment of a private practice.  Having been Surgeon in CONSTITUTION under both Hull and Bainbridge, and later in INDEPENDENCE, was "taken all aback" by your orders to return to that "minor situation."  Does not wish to resign, but will consider it if the orders are not revoked.  [Resigned 1824.]

 

From Lieutenant James Oellers, Philadelphia NY, 30 Mar 1821:

 

        Again applies for orders to CONSTITUTION, stating that Captain Jones has indicated he would be happy to have him.  [Ship full.]

 

From Midshipman A. J. D. Browne, USS INDEPENDENCE, 2 Apr 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Thomas J. Browne, USS INDEPENDENCE, 2 Apr 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Surgeon John H. Gordon, Philadelphia, PA, 5 Apr 1821:

 

        No answer received on request of 22 Mar.  Will proceed to Boston if I must.  [Revoked 7 Apr.]

 

From Lieutenant Charles H. Caldwell, USS INDEPENDENCE, 9 Apr 1821:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ship full.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate George S. Sproston, Baltimore, MD, 18 Apr 1821:

 

        Have received orders to CONSTITUTION today, and will proceed as soon as funds received.

 

From Surgeon John H. Gordon, Philadelphia, PA, 20 Apr 1821:

 

        If no replacement has yet been ordered, is now ready to accept orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Was replaced.]

 

Vol 60 (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1821)

 

From Sailing Master Briscoe Doxey, Washington, DC, 1 Jun 1821:

 

        Expresses his appreciation for the Secretary's permission to test his "propellor" in CONSTITUTION.  Notes that he was able to move the ship at 3 knots despite thecrew's unfamiliarity with the equipment and strong tides.  Says such defects as were found are "at fair way to remedy."  The device is still in the ship.  Forwards testimonials as to the results of the trial from Master Commandant Benjamin W. Booth; Lieutenants W. Boerum, Samuel L. Breeze, D. Geisinger, J. R. Jarvis, U. P. Levy, I. McKeever, Foxhall A. Parker, J. Percival, W. B. Schubrick, and George Washington Storer; Sailing Masters James Ferguson and Robert Knox; Purser Thos Breese; Midshhipmen H. j. Auchmuty, A. R. Bogardus, J. Bradford, John L. Buchanan, Saml F. Du Pont [sic]. Francis B. Ellison, Samuel Garham, John Hamilton, Edward S. Lewis, John H. Little, A. L. Paine, Wilson C. Purviance, Thos H. Saul, and John M. Sullivan; and Master Builder Josiah Barker.

 

From Lieutenant C. K. Stribling, Norfolk, VA, 21 Jun 1821:

 

        Per Commodore Jones' invitation, request orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

Vol 61 (July 1 ‑31, 1821)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 27, Vol 62 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1821)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 63 (September 1 ‑ October 15, 1821)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 64 (October 16 ‑ December 31, 1821)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 28, Vol 65 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1822)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 66 (March 1 ‑ April 30, 1822)

 

From Midshipman Simon W. Walsh, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Apr 1822:

 

        Requests his Midshipman's warrant.  [Annotated: "No certificate as such is required."]

 

Vol 67 (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1822)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, to Surgeon Samuel D. Heap, 30 Apr 1822:

 

        Ordered by SecNav to take on board CONSTITUTION the hospital stores at Pisa, and to "order home the medical gentleman belonging to that establishment," directs the stores to be brought to Leghorn for loading.

 

From Midshipman Wilson C. Purviance, New York, NY, 16 Jun 1822:

 

        Reports his arrival in the US, detached in "extreme ill health" from CONSTITUTION.  Requests permission to recover at Baltimore.

 

Roll 29, Vol 68 (July 1 ‑ August 31, 1822)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 69 (September 1 ‑ October 31, 1822)

 

From Midshipman Thompson D. Shaw, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 Sep 1822:

 

        Purser Breese has debitted his account for $50, representing the travel advance allowed.  Since he never  received a travel allowance from Philadelphia to Norfolk when he joined CONSTELLATION, requests it now largely to balance off the present debt.

 

From Lieutenant Pardon M. Whipple, Marseilles, France, ? Oct 1822:

 

        Reports himself off leave, having reported to CONSTITUTION until the Department's pleasure is known.

 

Vol 70 (November 1 ‑ December 31, 1822)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 30, Vol 71 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1823)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 72 (February 1 ‑ April 4, 1823)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 73 (April 4 ‑ May 8, 1823)

 

From Midshipman R. B. Bell, New York NY, 23 Apr 1823:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 31, Vol 74 (May 8 ‑ June 24, 1823)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 75 (June 24 ‑ July 30, 1823)

 

From Midshipman John H. Little, Baltimore, MD, 25 Jun 1823:

 

        Having been permitted to return to the US from CONSTITUTION, requests orders to the Baltimore Station.

 

From Midshipman Jott S. Paine, Washington, DC, 28 Jun 1823:

 

        "...Reason of Capt Jones' unfriendly disposition towards me ‑‑ Because I reported to him some circumstances in the conduct of the late Mid. Wilson C. Purviance, some of which were, and all of which are susceptible of being, probed, and insisted on a Court‑Martial or Court of Enquiry on the said Purviance.

"Reasons for my leaving the Mediterranean Firstly, Because I was tried by a Court Martial for reporting disgraceful conduct in Mr Purviance altho' it was proved in the Court that he did steal.

        "Secondly, Because I was debarred a priviledge [sic], during my trial which had been granted me by the Court, and contrary to the will of that Court, kept confined during the trial and afterwards, in addition to the sentence of the Court, was imprisoned on board the US Schooner Nonsuch, until my health had suffered so much that Lieut Comdt Turner of that vessel on the recommendation of the Surgeon, applied and obtained permission for me to visit the shore once in Naples.

        "Thirdly ‑‑ Because I was kept suspended from Duty, after the expiration of the term mentioned in the sentence of the Court.

        "Fourthly, Because there was an acting Appointment of Sailing Master given to Mid. James P. Wilson, while I was neglected, altho' in date of Warrant and having passed the Examination of October 1820.

        "Fifthly, Because I was imprisoned on board the U. S. Ship Ontario, without cause, and under the pretense that I had been the bearer of a challenge altho' it was not the case, and altho' Mid. Jones (son to Capt Jones) challenged two persons during the last winter, and no notice was taken of it notwithstanding it was publicly known ‑‑

        "Sixthly, Because I was refused a copy of the Proceedings of the Court, which I wished to publish, and was not furnished, even with a copy of the sentence.

        "Lastly, Because I wish, and feel myself capable of defending my character from any reports which may have reached the Dept since I have served under Capt Jones ‑‑

        "I only request that I may be considered on the same footing as if no misunderstanding had taken place between Capt. Jones and myself ‑‑ that I may receive orders for some vessell [sic] fitting out, and that I may be allowed a copy of the Proceedings and sentence of the Court ‑‑"  [Ordered to the New York Station that same day.]

 

Roll 32, Vol 76 (July 30 ‑ September 15, 1823)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 77 (September 15 ‑ October 21, 1823)

 

From Midshipman Samuel B. Cocke, Norfolk, VA, 14 Oct 1823:

 

        Reports his return from CONSTITUTION and requests orders to the Norfolk Station.  [Done.]

 

Roll 33, Vol 78 (October 21 ‑ November 30, 1823)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 79 (November 30 ‑ December 31, 1823)

 

From Surgeon L. Osborne, Washington, DC, 29 Dec 1823:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION for her next cruise.

 

Roll 34, Vol 80 (January 2 ‑ February 14, 1824)

 

From Lieutenant H. S. Newcomb, Providence, RI, 10 Jan 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION on the assumption she will return to the Mediterranean.  [Done.]

 

Vol 2 [sic: 81] (February 15 ‑ April 3, 1824)

 

From Purser E. N. Cox, New York, NY, 27 Feb 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 35, Vol 82 (April 3 ‑ May 19, 1824)

 

From Lieutenant E. A. F. Vallette, Philadelphia, PA, 15 Apr 1824:

 

        Protests orders to ONTARIO.  States that Commodore Macdonough had indicated an intention to request him as First Lieutenant in CONSTITUTION when he was appointed to that ship.

 

From Lieutenant E. A. F. Vallette, Philadelphia, PA, 15 Apr 1824:

 

        Forwards a letter he just received from Commodore Macdonough which confirms Macdonough's intention clearly but also states he has yet to make his desires known to the Secretary.

 

From Lieutenant E. A. F. Vallette, 1 May 1824:

 

        Expresses concern that he has not had a response to his earlier letters.  [Annotated: it has not yet been determined when and how Commodore Macdonough will go to sea; the Lieutenant must obey the order to join ONTARIO.  Commodore Macdonough's desires for particular officers will be addressed at the appropriate time.]

 

From Lieutenant John A. Wish, Charleston, SC, 5 May 1824:

 

        Understands CONSTITUTION is returning from the Mediterranean and will be immediately fitted out for another cruise.  Requests orders to her.

 

Vol 4 [sic: 83] (May 20 ‑ June 18, 1824)

 

From Midshipman James B. Glentworth, Trenton, NJ, 21 May 1824:

 

        Request a leave of absence and orders to the Boston Station to await CONSTITUTION.  [Annotated: "Attend to this immediately."]

 

From Midshipman John E. Prentiss, New York, NY, 21 May 1824:

 

        Requests 3 or 4 months leave of absence to recover his health, then orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Annotates: "Granted 4 mos."]

 

From Midshipman Henry J. Auchmuty, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to the Boston Station.

 

From Lieutenant D. Geisinger, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to the Boston Station.

 

From Lieutenant Samuel L. Breese, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 May 1824:

 

        Requests 4‑6 months leave to visit family in Utica, NY.

 

From Lieutenant P. M. Whipple, USS CONSTITUTION, ? May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to Washington in order to settle accounts outstanding since 1821.

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to Boston Station, where his family is.

 

From Lieutenant W. Boerum, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 May 1824:

 

        Requests "a few months" leave.

 

From George S. Sproston, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 May 1824:

 

        Reports the transfer of all medical stores to the hospital ashore and commends his assistant, Surgeon's Mate Thomas Boyd.

 

From Surgeon's Mate T. J. Boyd, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 May 1824:

 

        Requests 5 months leave of absence.

 

From Midshipman Edward Hoban, Washington, DC, 25 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant P. M. Whipple, New York, NY, 27 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders and travel expenses to Washington to settle accounts.  [Orders issued; expenses to be paid if Auditor certifies his presence necessary.]

 

From Midshipman Richard D. Miller, New York, NY, 27 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant Thomas W. Freelon, Charlestown, MA, 27 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Chaplain Addison Searle, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 May 1824:

 

        Requests a leave of absence.  [Granted.]

 

From Midshipman Richard H. Morris, Springfield, MA, 29 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Samuel Lockwood, Norwich, VT, 29 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon L. Osborne, New York, NY, 31 May 1824:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman S. William Walsh, USS CONSTITUTION, 31 May 1824:

 

        Requests orders to the Philadelphia Station in order to attend the "Mathematical School" there.

 

From Midshipman Thompson D. Shaw, Philadelphia, PA, 1 Jun 1824:

 

        Permitted, due to ill health, to proceed to his home, he requests permission to remain there until well.  [Granted.]

 

From Thomas Brown, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Jun 1824:

 

        If it is intended to recruit for CONSTITUTION here, be advised that Seamen "may be difficult to procure."

 

From Midshipman John L. Ball, Washington, DC, 2 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Isaac Mayo, Annapolis, MD, 3 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Edward S. Lewis, USS OHIO, 4 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION. [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Amasa Paine, Jr., USS SHARK, 5 Jun 1824:

 

        With both commanders' permission, requests permission to exchange with Midshipman James K. Vallette in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Lloyd B. Newell, Washington, DC, 5 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant T. W. Wyman, Portsmouth, NH, 9 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman John T. Jenkins, USS SHARK, 10 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant William M. Armstrong, Norfolk, VA, 10 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant M. P. Mix, USS OHIO, 13 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Harrison H. Cocke, New York, NY, 13 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Charles N. Armstrong, Elizabethtown, NJ, 15 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Chaplain John Cook, New York, NY, 15 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipmen Richard D. Millen and Edward S. Lewis, New York, NY, 16 Jun 1824:

 

        Request orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Lewis done.]

 

From Midshipman James K. Vallette, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to the West Indies Squadron.  [Ordered to USS DECOY.]

 

From Midshipman Philip A. Stockton, Sidney, NJ, 17 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant G. J. Pendergast, Washington, DC, 17 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 36, Vol 5 [sic: 84] (June 18 ‑ July 30, 1824)

 

From Midshipman John Pope, Charlestown NY, 18 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Edward H. Hubbard, Belfast, MD, 20 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant George Washington Storer, Portsmouth, [NH], 21 Jun 1824:

 

        Currently on leave from CONSTITUTION, repeats request orders to the Portsmouth Station first made on 23 May.

 

From Midshipman James B. Glentworth, Trenton, NJ, 22 Jun 1824:

 

        In view of no response to request for orders to CONSTITUTION, requests orders to NORTH CAROLINA.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman Francis B. Ellison, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to attend the school on board USS WASHINGTON.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate Joseph B. Stillman, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to the West Indies or the Pacific.  [Ordered to USS SHARK.]

 

From Lieutenant William Taylor, USS CONGRESS, 23 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION, "having served on board her during all the late war."  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Andrew A. Harwood, Trenton, NJ, 26 jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or NORTH CAROLINA.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman George A. Magruder, USS WASHINGTON, 30 Jun 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Henry W. Morris, New York, NY, 2 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman J. E. Calhoun, Philadelphia, PA, 5 Jul 1824:

 

        Awaits orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Forthcoming.]

 

From Purser Thomas Breese, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jul 1824:

 

        His accounts are ready for settlement.  What is to be done with those for officers still in ship?

 

From Sailing Master W. B. Nicholson, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests reordering to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Augustus Barnhouse, Washington NY, 13 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to NORTH CAROLINA or CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

 From Midshipman Daniel L. Randolph, Norwich, CT, 14 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or NORTH CAROLINA.

 

From Lieutenant Charles L. Williamson, Elizabethtown, NJ, 15 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Amasa Paine, Jr., USS SHARK, 15 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or NORTH CAROLINA.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman Thomas L. Leib, USS WASHINGTON, 17 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Charles Hay, Philadelphia, PA, 19 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant William M. Armstrong, Norfolk, VA, 19 Jul 1824:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION or ONTARIO.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman James B. Lardner, Holmesburg, PA, 20 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to NORTH CAROLINA, CONSTITUTION, or ONTARIO.  [Not to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Surgeon's Mate Edmund L. Dubarry, Washington, DC, 22 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman John H. Marshall, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests his warrant.

 

From Midshipman John J. Glasson, USS GRAMPUS, 27 Jul 1824:

 

        Requests orders to NORTH CAROLINA or CONSTITUTION.  [Not to CONSTITUTION.]

 

Vol 6 [sic: 85] (July 30 ‑ September 24, 1824)

 

From Midshipman James B. Glentworth, Trenton, NJ, 31 Jul 1824:

 

        Has received his orders to CONSTITUTION, together with those for Midshipman Harwood who isn't present.

 

From Midshipman Robert G. Robb, USS GRAMPUS, 1 Aug 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or NORTH CAROLINA.  [Done for CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman F. S. Gibbon, Washington, DC, 2 Aug 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman George A. Magruder, USS WASHINGTON, 11 Aug 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Samuel Swartwout, New York, NY, 15 Aug 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, New York NY, 16 Aug 1824:

 

        Midshipman Augustus Barnhouse has been suspended for flagrant breach of discipline in sending libelous notes concerning Purser John B. Timberlake.  Further, his conduct toward me has been "indecorous."

 

From Midshipman Daniel L. Randolph, Newport, RI, 30 Aug 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or NORTH CAROLINA.  [Not to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman Richard R. W. Mullin, USS ALERT, 3 Sep 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Samuel Mercer, New York, NY, ? Sep 1824:

 

        Suffering from an eye ailment, and on the advice of his doctor, requests orders as a supernumerary in CONSTITUTION where the sea environment is hoped will promote a cure.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Benjamin Page, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Sep 1824:

 

        Per orders, has reported to the ship.  He is, however, ill with a disease "of a delicate nature" and asks for a 6‑month furlough.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman James H. Ward, New York, NY, 17 Sep 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman John W. West, Philadelphia, PA, 18 Sep 1824:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or NORTH CAROLINA.  {Not CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Midshipman Charles E. Hawkins, New York, NY, 18 Sep 1824:

 

        Requests orders for CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Edmund L. Dubarry, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Sep 1824:

 

        Cancels request for orders to leave the ship.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Samuel L. Breese, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Sep 1824:

 

        Wishes to remain in ship, as supernumerary if necessary.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Charles E. Hawkins, New York, NY, 22 Sep 1824:

 

        Again applies for CONSTITUTION.

 

Roll 37, Vol 7 [sic: 86] (September 24 ‑ November 8, 1824)

 

From Midshipman Charles E. Hawkins, New York NY, 27 Sep 1824:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Samuel L. Breese, New York, NY, 30 Sep 1824:

 

        Again requests to remain in the ship as a supernumerary.  [No.]

 

From Purser John B. Timberlake, USS CONSTITUTION, no date:

 

        Reports that all officers joining the ship have received two months advance pay in addition to whatever was due them.  Wishes to know the Secretary's orders of they seek more money prior to sailing.

 

 From Midshipman John W. West, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Oct 1824:

 

        Has gone to considerable expense in preparing himself for a 3‑year cruise in CONSTITUTION on being told by Captain Finch that he would get orders.  The orders have not yet appeared.  [None issued.]

 

From Sailmaker Benjamin Burchsted, Boston, MA, 8 Oct 1824:

 

        Having been out of touch on furlough, am I still attached to CONSTITUTION?  [Annotated affirmatively.]

 

From Midshipman Samuel Swartwout, New York, NY, 12 oct 1824:

 

        CONSTITUTION "is on the eve of sailing" and still no orders to her.  [Coming.]

 

From Gunner John Lord, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Oct 1824:

 

        Requests permission for his wife to accompany him on the cruise.

 

From Midshipman Charles M. Armstrong, New York, NY, 20 Oct 1824:

 

        Am I not to go in CONSTITUTION?  [Annotated: "Same as to Marshall."]

 

From Midshipman John H. Marshall, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Oct 1824:

 

        I refused to take the furlough offered the ship's officers when we returned on the understanding I would go out in her again.  Is that not to be?  [Granted.]

 

From Chaplain John McCarty, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Oct 1824:

 

        Per your orders of the 16th, I reported aboard this morning.  Because of my wife's continued delicate health, and the welfare of our 2 children (1 only 3 months old) I again request orders ashore.  [Annotated: "I regret that it is now so late that it is impossible to supply Constn. with any other Chn. before she sails.  I had not seen your letter of 4 Aug...and did not know of your request when the order was given.  As it is, you had best go in the Conn.  Direct your friends to inform me of the situation of your family before the N.C. sails & if it be indispensible an arrangement may be probably made for your return at that time."]

 

From Midshipman Grey Skipwith, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Oct 1824:

 

        Requests his half pay.

 

From Lieutenant Pardon M. Whipple, [Oct 1824]:

 

        Finds he is listed as owing the Department money.  The possible incident which led to such listing occurred in 1813 when he was ordered by Captain Stewart of CONSTITUTION, through Mr. Ballard, to draw $400 from Boston Navy Agent Amos Binney and deliver it to Midshipman Gilliam, recruiting at Providence, RI.  This he did, but being newly in service and inexperienced, he neglected to get a receipt from Gilliam.  Nonetheless, when the rendezvous was closed, our accounts were settled with the 4th Auditor and Gilliam paid "a considerable balance."  In 1819, the 4th Auditor informed him he had to account for the $400.  The Secretary was supposed to direct the 4th Auditor to seek accounting from Gilliam, then out of the country.  In 1823, while overseas, his pay was stopped for 7 months by the 4th Auditor for a total of $438, severely embarrassing him.  Now also being held accountable for $50 given him by Captain Stewart from the ship's contingency fund when ordered to command a cartel into Barbados in 1814.  Requests justice.  [A confirming letter from Captain Henry E. Ballard is enclosed.]  [Annotated: the first charge cannot be voided without vouchers; the second could be if he can provide evidence of his orders relative to the cartel.]

 

From Sailmaker Benjamin B. Burchsted, Boston, MA, 4 Nov 1824:

 

        Your letter directing me to report to Captain Macdonough was received on 23 Oct and I immediately reported in writing.  He responded with a letter I received on 30 Oct that I should have reported in person and to do so immediately.  On arrival here, I found the ship had sailed.  I would be happy for orders to NORTH CAROLINA.

 

Vol 8 [sic: 87] (November 8 ‑ December 31, 1824)

 

From Master Commandant Benjamin W. Booth, Washington, DC, 13 Nov 1824:

 

        Requests pay due one of his grade serving as captain of a frigate in light of his duty in CONSTITUTION under Commodore Jones.  Says he deserves it even though it was known that squadron commanders in frigates were not entitled to "flag captains."  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant Foxhall A. Parker, New York, NY, 17 Nov 1824:

 

        Reports receiving a letter from the 4th Auditor refusing him any additional allowance for having acted as CONSTITUTION's captain unless authorized by the Secretary.

        "When Master Commandant Booth left the Constitution in October 1821, I was ordered by Commodore Jones to act in his place; removed from the Wardroom to the Cabin and performed the duties assigned to me as Captain of the ship untill [sic] her return to this port in May..."

 

From Lieutenant H. S. Newcomb, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Nov 1824:

 

        NONSUCH returned unexpectedly to the US, leaving him without a command.  Will await orders here.

 

Roll 38, Vol 1 [sic: 88] (January 1 ‑ February 27, 1825)

 

From Surgeon S. D. Heap, Tunis, Tunisia, 8 Jan 1825:

 

        "...Com. McDonough [sic], anxious on account of the leaky state of his ship [CONSTITUTION], to get into winter quarters, Syracuse, could render me no assistance..."

 

From Midshipman Grey Skipwith, East Greenwich, RI, 26 Feb 1825:

 

        Reports his return to the US with permission from Commodore Macdonough on the grounds that he intended to resign.  Has changed his mind and wishes orders to USS FRANKLIN.

 

Vol 2 [sic: 89] (February 27 ‑ April 3, 1825)

 

From Midshipman Henry Kip Mower, New York, NY, 21 Mar 1825:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to join CONSTITUTION.

 

Roll 39, Vol 3 [sic: 90] (April 3 ‑ May 25, 1825)

 

From Midshipman Frederick Gibbon, New York, 15 Apr 1825:

 

        Reports being invalided home from CONSTITUTION with a condition that "has nearly deprived me of the use of my legs and feet."

 

From Lieutenant Joseph Cross, Washington, DC, 26 Apr 1825:

 

        Reports being invalided home from CONSTITUTION; requests leave.

 

Vol 4 [sic: 91] (May 25 ‑ July 4, 1825)

 

From Midshipman John W. Mooers, New York, NY, 31 May 1825:

 

        Reports his return to the US per orders of Commodore Macdonough.

 

Roll 40, Vol 5 [sic: 92] (July 4 ‑ August 14, 1825)

 

From Midshipman John W. Mooers, New York, NY, 8 Jul 1825:

 

        Reports his arrival in the US from CONSTITUTION, as ordered by Commodore Macdonough in consequence of his having been associated with a duel, and requests to know the Secretary's desires.

 

From Midshipman Samuel Swartwout, New York, 8 Jul 1825:

 

        Reports his arrival in the US from CONSTITUTION, as ordered by Commodore Macdonough in consequence of his having been associated with a duel, and requests to know the Secretary's desires.

 

From Midshipman Samuel Swartwout, New York, 7 Aug 1825:

 

        Still awaiting orders.

 

Vol 6 [sic: 93] (August 15 ‑ September 16, 1825)

 

From Chaplain John McCarty, Clermont, NY, 1 Sep 1825:

 

        Reports his return to the US and the great improvement in his wife's health; no longer wishes to resign.

 

Roll 41, Vol 7 [sic: 94] (September 16 ‑ October 26, 1825)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 8 [sic: 95] (October 27 ‑ November 27, 1825)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 9 [sic: 96] (November 28 ‑ December 31, 1825)

 

From Midshipman Joseph Arnold, Philadelphia, 28 Dec 1825:

 

        Reports being invalided home from CONSTITUTION; requests 6 months leave of absence.  [Granted.]

 

Roll 42, Vol 1 [sic: 97] (January 1 ‑ February 9, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 [sic: 98] (February 9 ‑ March 12, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

 Vol 3 [sic: 99] (March 12 ‑ April 18, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 43, Vol 4 [sic: 100] (April 18 ‑ May 26, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 5 [sic: 101] (May 26 ‑ July 9, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 6 [sic: 102] (July 10 ‑ August 8, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 44, Vol 7 [sic: 103] (August 8 ‑ September 14, 1826)

 

From Midshipman S. W. Downing, New York, NY, 8 Aug 1826:

 

        Reports that he was granted leave from CONSTITUTION to travel in Europe in Oct 1825 with orders to rejoin the ship by 1 Apr 1826.  Further reports that when he was in Leghorn, he learned the ship was at Gibraltar and took passage thence.  On arrival there, he found that CONSTITUTION already had sailed for Smyrna, that the ship in which he was taking passage would not be allowed out of quarantine, and that he would not be allowed either to go ashore or transfer to another ship.  Thus, he was returned to New York.  Requests orders.  [Directed to return to the ship by the earliest passage he can arrange; no penalties.]

 

Vol 8 [sic: 104] (September 14 ‑ November 3, 1826

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 45, Vol 9 [sic: 105] (November 2 ‑ 28, 1826)

 

From Midshipman Richard H. Morris, New York, NY, 16 Nov 1826:

 

        Reports his return to the US in poor health.  Requests leave of absence to recover.

 

From Midshipman Richard H. Morris, New York, NY, 20 Nov 1826:

 

        Repeats his previous letter.

 

Vol 10 [sic: 106] (November 28 ‑ December 31, 1826)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 46, Vol 1 [sic: 107] (January 2 ‑ February 28, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 1 [sic: 108] (January 1 ‑ May 18, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 47, Vol 2 [sic: 109] (March 1‑ May 11, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 [sic: 110] (June 1 ‑ 30, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 48, Vol 3 [sic: 111] (July 1 ‑ 31, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 3 [sic: 112] (May 6 ‑ December 29, 1827)

 

From Surgeon James Cornick, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Aug 1827:

 

        Seeks to explain a charge made against his account by the 4th Auditor.

 

Roll 49, Vol 113 (August 1 ‑ September 30, 1827)

 

From Midshipmen John H. Marshall, Charles C. Turner, C. A. Hansford, and Amasa Paine, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Sep 1827:

 

        Orders requested to return to the US to make the examination for Lieutenant.

 

Roll 50, Vol 5 [sic: 114] (October 1 ‑ 31, 1827)

 

From Midshipman Andrew A. Harwood, Boston, MA, 6 Oct 1827:

 

        Reports his return from CONSTITUTION to take the examination for Lieutenant.

 

Vol 6 [sic: 115] (November 1 ‑ 30, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 7 [sic: 116] (December 1 ‑ 31, 1827)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 51, Vol 1 [sic: 117] (January 1 ‑ February 29, 1828)

 

From Midshipman Andrew A. Harwood, Philadelphia, PA, 10 Jan 1828:

 

        Reports he has passed the examination and wishes to remind the Department of his service record as it might affect his seniority as a Lieutenant.

 

From Midshipman Edmond M. Russell, Washington, DC, 29 Feb 1828:

 

        Reports having passed the examination for Lieutenant and wishes to remind the Department of his service record as it might affect his seniority as a Lieutenant.

 

Vol 2 [sic: 118] (March 1 ‑31, 1828)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 3 [sic: 119] (April 1 ‑ 30, 1828)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 52, Vol 4 [sic: 120] (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1828)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 5 [sic: 121] (July 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

From Lieutenant Robert B. Randolph, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Jul 1828:

 

        Has been acting Purser since John Timberlake's death.  Requests advice from the Department has to how best to carry out his temporary duties, and also money with which to pay off the crew.  Recommends that he and Purser's Clerk Thomas Newman be ordered to Washington when that is done to close the books.

 

From Midshipman James N. Forsyth, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Jul 1828:

 

        Reports his return from the Mediterranean in bad health, invalided home in CONSTITUTION.  Requests a furlough and advance of pay.

 

From Lieutenant John A. Carr, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 Jul 1828:

 

        Reports his return as a passenger in CONSTITUTION.  Requests leave.

 

From Lieutenant T. J. Manning, New York, NY, 9 Jul 1828:

 

        Reports his return in CONSTITUTION as ordered by Commodore William Crane of the Mediterranean Squadron.

 

From Surgeon's Mate John F. Brooke, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Jul 1828:

 

        Reports his return in CONSTITUTION and requests orders to the Boston Navy Yard.

 

From Midshipman H. H. Rhodes, New York, NY, 9 Jul 1828:

 

        Having returned from the Mediterranean in CONSTITUTION, presents himself for the Lieutenant's examination.

 

From Midshipman Samuel Lockwood, New York, NY, 12 Jul 1828:

 

        Reports his return from the Mediterranean in CONSTITUTION in order to take the Lieutenant's examination.

 

From Midshipman Thomas Sands, Annapolis, MD, 16 Jul 1828:

 

        States he understood he was ordered home in CONSTITUTION to take the Lieutenant' examination.

 

From Midshipman Daniel Randolph, Newport, RI, 17 Jul 1828:

 

        Reports his return in CONSTITUTION and requests a furlough to prepare for the Lieutenant's examination.

 

From Surgeons Hyde Ray and James Cornick, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Jul 1828:

 

        "We are of opinion, that some other plan, should be devised to supply our vessels of war in the Mediterranean, with medicines and hospital stores, than the one pursued at present.  It has been found very difficult to find on station, such articles as the service requires, and they have generally proved of bad quality and extremely dear.  To be satisfied that the prices are exorbitantly high, it will only be necessary to examine the requisitions of the different vessels of the squadron, and particularly of the Constitution during the last summer at Smyrna; which is the most unfit place for this purpose, and where our vessels are compelled to get what they stand in need of, as they are kept cruising in the Archipelago.  At Gibraltar the prices are more than double what they are in the United States and the commonest remedies not always to be had.

        "We are, therefore, of the opinion that the service would be greatly benefited if these inconveniences were removed, and that this could be best done by having all our medicines and hospital stores sent from the United States, with the other supplies for the squadron; and by appointing some person whose business it should be to select and have them properly disposed for transportation by sea: for the great variety of vegetable preparations, used in medicine, are very liable to injury from negligence in this respect.

        "We are also confident that in order to take proper care of these things after their arrival in the Mediterranean, to save the Government many thousand dollars, and the lives of many seamen annually, a surgeon should be permanently established at Mahon.  In so large a squadron as tours there is always a number of men with chronic complaints that might get well on shore, but generally die aboard ship.  On an island in the harbour of Mahon is a very large and extensive government hospital any part of which might be obtained by application and would answer our views perfectly.  If a Surgeon were to be sent there to do the duty of purveyor, and take charge of such men as it might be thought adviseable [sic] to send on shore, we feel assured that many lives would be saved, besides the other advantages resulting from such a system."  [Recommendations included in orders to Surgeon Andrew B. Cook, Surgeon‑designate of the Mediterranean Squadron, dated 29 Jul 1828, and further discussed in his letter to SecNav dated 2 Aug 1828, reproduced in this same series.]

 

From Lieutenant R. B. Randolph, Boston, MA, 28 Jul 1828:

 

        Again seeks guidance on how to close out the accounts of the late Purser John B. Timberlake.

 

Roll 53, Vol 6 [sic: 122] (August 1 ‑ September 30, 1828)

 

From Lieutenant R. B. Randolph, Boston, MA, 6 Aug 1828:

 

        Reports that Ordinary Seaman Joseph Arnett, a "worthless Scoundrel" and deserter from CONSTITUTION, had appeared with his landlord to collect his pay and argued that the amount said due him was too small.  He later failed to return for an explanatory meeting.  What is to be done?

 

Vol 7 [sic: 123] (October 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 54, Vol 8 [sic: 124] (November 1 ‑ 30, 1828)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 9 [sic: 125] (December 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 55, Vol 126 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 127 (March 1 ‑ April 29, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 56, Vol 128 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 4 [sic] (June 1 ‑ 30, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 57 (July 1 ‑ August 31, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 58 (September 1 ‑ October 31, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 59, Vol 7 [sic] (November 1 ‑ 30, 1829)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 8 [sic] (December 1 ‑ 31, 1829)

 

From Surgeon John A. Kearney, Washington, DC, 19 Dec 1829:

 

        In requesting orders, provides a recapitulation of his service, including "...1814... In August of that year was appointed Surgeon of the U. S. Frigate Constitution Commo Stewart ‑‑ 1815 February 20th was Engaged in action with H.B.M. Ships Cyane and Levant, when they were captured..."

 

Roll 60, Vol 1 [sic] (January 1 ‑ 30, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 [sic] (February 1 ‑ 28, 1830)

 

From Sailing Master Charles F. Waldo, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Feb 1830:

 

        In making a request to be retained in service at a time when the number of Sailing Masters is being reduced, includes a recapitulation of his service, including:    "...That during the last War, in the Month of October 1812, he joined the Naval Service of the United States, having previously commanded a Vessel in the Merchant Service for five years‑‑  That he was in the capacity of Master's Mate on board the Frigate Constitution, under Commodore Bainbridge in the action and capture of the British Frigate Java ‑ in which action he had the misfortune to lose his left leg‑  That in March 1813 he was warranted as a Sailing Master..."  Notes he now 46 years old, with a wife and 6 children.

 

Roll 61 (March 1 ‑ April 30, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 62, Vol 4 [sic] (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 5 [sic] (July 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 63, Vol 6 [sic] (August 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 7 [sic] (September 1 ‑ 30, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 64 [sic] (October 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry H. Bell, Old Point Comfort, VA, 18 Oct 1830:

 

        Requests orders as Sailing Master in CONSTITUTION or any other ship bound to the Pacific or Brazil station.  [Never ordered to CONSTITUTION.]

 

Unnumbered [sic] (November 1 ‑ December 31, 1830)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 65 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 66 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

From Lieutenant J. Collings Long, Portsmouth, NH, 6 Mar  1831:

 

        Notes he has been in the Navy 19 Years, 14 of them as a lieutenant.  Sailed with Bainbridge and Stewart during the war, then in the West Indies and with Hull in the Pacific.  Requests command of DOLPHIN and a return to the Pacific.  [He got it.]

 

Roll 67, Vol 1 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 68 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 69, Vol 1 (July 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

From Lieutenant Stephan Champlin, Lebanon, CT, 10 Aug 1831:

 

        In recapitulating his career, notes his appointment as Sailing Master in Feb 1813 at Newport and subsequent orders to take a draft of men to Sacketts Harbor.  He goes on, "...in June following I was ordered to Boston for another draft of men ‑ in July 1813 I was ordered by Comd Chauncey to take charge of Seventy men and report to Comd Perry..."  [This may have included the final group of CONSTITUTIONs ordered thither from Boston, and then some of those who were sent on to Lake Erie.]

 

Roll 70, Vol 1 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 71, Vol 1 (November 1 ‑ December 1, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 72, Vol 1 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (February 1 ‑ 14, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 73, Vol 1 (February 14 ‑ 29, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 74, Vol 1 (April 1 ‑ 16, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (April 17 ‑ 30, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 75 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 76, Vol 1 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 77 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roil 78 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 79, Vol 1 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 80 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 81, Vol 1 (January 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 82 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

From Purser Joseph W. Terry, Pensacola Navy Yard, 26 Mar 1833:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Annotated: "...noted and filed..."]

 

Roll 83  (April 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 84  (May 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 85 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 86, Vol 1 (July 1 ‑ 18, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2  (July 18 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 87, Vol 1 (August 1 ‑ 15, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2  (August 15 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 88 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 89 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 90, Vol 1 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2  (December 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 91, Vol 1 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (February 1 ‑ 13, 1834)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 3 (February 13 ‑ 28, 1834)

 

From Purser John N. Hambleton, St. Michael's, MD, 24 Feb 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION, or the next ship of that class to be fitted out.

 

Roll 92, Vol 1 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 3 (May 1 ‑ 16, 1834)

 

From Midshipman Stephen Dod, Newark, NJ, 4 May 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He didn't get them.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Boston Navy Yard, 11 May 1834:

 

        Requests orders to POTOMAC or CONSTITUTION.  [He got the latter.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Heywood, New York, NY, 14 May 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION as 2nd Master.  [He didn't get them.]

 

From Assistant Surgeon John A. Lockwood, Dover, DE, 14 May 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He didn't get them.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Cicero Price, Norfolk, VA, 16 May 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He didn't get them.]

 

Roll 93, Vol 1 (May 16 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Midshipman Montgomery Lewis, Baltimore, MD, 25 May 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION, which, he understands, is to be sent to the Mediterranean "in the fall."  [He got them.]

 

Vol 2 (June 1 ‑ 14, 1834)

 

From Lieutenant Harrison M. Carter, Petersburg, VA, 3 Jun 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION "or any other frigate, as executive officer."  [He didn't get CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Joseph W. Revere, Washington, DC, 12 June 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He got them.]

 

Vol 3 (June 14 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

From Purser John de Bree, Norfolk, VA, 18 Jun 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He didn't get them.]

 

From Carpenter William L. Shuttleworth, USS HUDSON, 22 Jun 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He didn't get them.]

 

From Captain [?] A. Ludlow, Newburgh, NY, 24 Jun 1834:

 

        Requests command of CONSTITUTION.  [Not found in Register.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry Walke, Philadelphia Navy Yard, 26 Jun 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He didn't get them.]

 

Roll 94 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Purser John de Bree, Norfolk, VA, 2 Jul 1834:

 

        Is "much disappointed" upon notification that he will not receive orders to CONSTITUTION.  Believes it only just that he receive such orders and repeats his request.  [No.]

 

From Purser John N. Hambleton, Washington, DC, 9 Jul 1834:

 

        Repeats his request for orders to POTOMAC or CONSTITUTION.  [Still no.]

 

From Carpenter William L. Shuttleworth, USS HUDSON, 18 Jul 1834:

 

        Changes his request from CONSTITUTION to POTOMAC, since he believes she will sail first.

 

From Midshipman William P. Bradburn, USS ST LOUIS, 21 Jul 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant John Colhoun, Philadelphia, PA, 24 Jul 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Midshipman James A. Doyle, USS ST LOUIS, 25 Jul 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Charles F. McIntosh, Norfolk, VA, ? Jul 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 95 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Midshipman Benjamin F. Anderson, Norfolk, VA, 23 Aug 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Gunner Thomas Ripley, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Aug 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry Darcantel, Washington, DC, 25 Aug 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION as Sailing Master.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Lafayette Maynard, Richmond VA, 27 Aug 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION. [No.]

 

Roll 96, Vol 1 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

From Midshipman M. Mason, Clermont, VA, 1 Sep 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman J. N. Maffitt, Washington, DC, 17 Sep 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [He got them.]

 

From Lieutenant W. C. Nicholson, Baltimore, MD, 27 Sep 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Carpenter Richard Thomas, Baltimore, MD, 27 Sep 1834:

 

        Notes he is now the senior Carpenter in the Navy.  In summing up his service, notes "...in 1821 I again went to that sea [the Mediterranean] in the Frigate Constitution, Comr. Jones, & with him, & Commodores McDonough [sic], & Patterson in the same ship, & remained in that sea until 1828..."  Requests a renewal of a leave of absence.

 

Vol 2 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Heywood, New York, NY, 6 Oct 1834:

 

        Confirms his request for orders to CONSTITUTION as 2nd Master.  [To no avail.]

 

From Carpenter John A. Dickason, Portsmouth Navy Yard, 10 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Passed Midshipman John T. Williams, Huntsville, NC, 13 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Frederick Oakes, Jr., Hartford, CT, 13 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Lieutenant W. Smith, Washington, DC, 13 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Not until 1839.]

 

From Purser John N. Hambleton, St. Michael's, MD, 21 Oct 1834:

 

        Complains that the appointment of Purser Etting to CONSTITUTION was unfair in that Hambleton is his senior and "the oldest purser in the Navy who has not had a frigate..."  Is concerned that there is some mark on his record of which he is unaware.  [Annotated to the effect he will receive such orders "at the proper time."]

 

From Lieutenant A. G. Slaughter, USS JAVA, 23 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman William S. Ringgold, Georgetown, MD, 29 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Passed Midshipman James T. McDonough, Gosport Navy Yard, 29 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Sylvanus Godon, Philadelphia, PA, 29 Oct 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 97, Vol 1 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

From Passed Midshipman A. Ludlow Case, Newburgh, NY, 2 Nov 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION "or the first Ship going to Sea."  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman F. W. Walbach, Annapolis, MD, 6 Nov 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman R. Perry, Cumberland, MD, 14 Nov 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Assistant Surgeon J. W. Rummer, Petersburg, VA, 19 Nov 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Washington, DC, 20 Nov 1834:

 

        Requests reassurance that he will receive orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry Darcantel, Washington, DC, 28 Nov 1834:

 

        Inquires about his request for orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman P. W. Humphreys, Lexington, KY, 29 Nov 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Vol 2 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Midshipman George T. Sinclair, USS JAVA, 4 Dec 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Lieutenant Frank B. Ellison, Brooklyn, NY, 10 Dec 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No, not this time.]

 

From Gunner Thomas Ryby, New London, CT, 12 Dec 1834:

 

        Inquires about his previous request for orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Assistant Surgeon J. W. Rummer, Philadelphia, PA, 12 Dec 1834:

 

        Inquires about his previous request for orders to CONSTITUITION.

 

From Passed Midshipman James Alden, Boston Navy Yard, 22 Dec 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Not until 1844.]

 

From Lieutenant W. Nicholson, Baltimore, MD, 24 Dec 1834:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No, not this time.]

 

From Passed Midshipman William Lewis Herndon, Fredericksburg, VA, 29 Dec 1834:

 

        Requested orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Roll 98, Vol 1 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Steedman, Charleston, SC, 1 Jan 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION "or any other Vessel going to the Mediterranean..."  [Yes.]

 

From Lieutenant J. M. Watson, Washington, DC, 12 Jan 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Not until 1837.]

 

From Passsed Midshipman A. A. Holcomb, Versailles, KY, 16 Jan 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Thomas W. Brent, Washington, DC, 21 Jan 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Charles E. Fleming, New York, NY, 24 Jan 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Midshipman William Edwin Newton, Burlington, NJ, 25 Jan 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

Vol 2 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1835)

 

From William Ronckendorff, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Gunner Thomas Ryby, New London, CT, 2 Feb 1835:

 

        Repeats his request for orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant William Green, Norfolk, VA, 2 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders "to either of the Frigates fitting out for sea service."  [Not CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Purser John N. Hambleton, Washington, DC, 5 Feb 1835:

 

        Reiterates his "oldest purser" thesis in requesting orders.

 

From Lieutenant Charles C. Turner, Washington, DC, 5 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Not this time.]

 

From Midshipman James A. Doyle, USS JAVA, 6 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Allen W. Lane, Wilmington, DE, 13 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION, with permission to return in USS DELAWARE.  [Annotated: "It is not certain the Constitution will proceed to the Med."]

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles F. M. Spotswood, Salines, [?], 15 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant John B. Montgomery, Brooklyn, NY, 17 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION dated 14 Feb.  As he had no prior notice, and as his wife is sick abed, requests the longest possible delay in reporting.  [Annotated to the effect that he can delay as long as Commodore Elliott will allow.]

 

From Lieutenant F. A. Neville, Philadelphia, PA, 17 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Assistant Surgeon Isaac Brinckerhoff, Philadelphia, PA, 17 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges orders to CONSTITUTION dated 14 Feb.

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, Philadelphia, PA, 17 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION dated 14 Feb.

 

From Boatswain John McNelly, Windsor, VT, 18 Feb 1835:

 

        Reports that Commodore Elliott has told him to hold himself in readiness for orders to CONSTITUTION.  Requests authority to make a $20/mo. allowance for his family.  He would prefer to stay home, as his father is ill and debts have amassed.  [Annotated that a Boatswain already has been ordered, leaving a vacant billet at the Boston Navy Yard.]

 

 From Midshipman Oliver Perry Baldwin, Hudson, NY, 18 Feb 1835:

 

        Understands CONSTITUTION is to visit New York before going overseas.  Requests orders to "a ship which is the favorite of the Navy and the country."  [No.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Boston Navy Yard, 19 Feb 1835:

 

        "Gratefully" acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Cullen Barton, USS SEA GULL, 19 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Francis S. Haggerty, Philadelphia, PA, 19 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION dated 17 Feb.

 

From Carpenter John Dickason, Portsmouth Navy Yard, 19 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION dated 14 Feb 1835.

 

From Lieutenant W. C. Nicholson, Philadelphia, PA, 19 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.  Requests leave until 10 Mar due to death in the family.  [Annotated to the effect that the orders were changed to have him report while the ship is at New York.]

 

From Boatswain W. Hart, Boston Navy Yard, 20 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION dated 14 Feb.  Reports he is still lame, the product of recovering from an accident incurred while heaving out USS ERIE in which his right leg was broken.  Cannot climb rigging.  Suggests he be left in the Yard.  [Orders revoked.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Percival Drayton, Philadelphia, PA, 20 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Chaplain James Everett, Boston Navy Yard, 21 Feb 1835:

 

        Has reported for duty in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Frederick Oakes, Jr., Hartford, CT, 21 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Steedman, Charleston, SC, 22 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant Edward C. Rutledge, Charleston, SC, 22 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders "to Boston" [CONSTITUTION].

 

From Surgeon Thomas J. Boyd, Wilmington, DE, 22 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.  The unexpectedness of the orders and their immediacy has found him without proper housing for his wife, who is at a late stage of pregnancy.  Wishes to delay reporting until the ship is in New York.  [Annotated that he is to report in New York "by the 4th."]

 

From Midshipman Allen W. Lane, Wilmington, DE, 24 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Feb 1835:

 

        Reports his relief at the Yard is urgently needed in order to insure a proper turnover of accounts, etc.  [Repeats his concern in a second ltr the next day.]

 

From Passed Midshipman James P. McKinstry, Detroit, MI, 26 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Melancton Smith, New York, NY, 26 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Not until 1848.]

 

From Midshipman Edward C. Anderson, Savannah, GA, 28 Feb 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Passed Midshipman John M. Berrien, Norfolk, VA, 28 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION as 2nd Master dated 23 Feb.

 

From Boatswain Robert Whittaker, New York, NY, 28 Feb 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

Roll 99, Vol 1 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Midshipman Stephen Decatur Trenchard, New York Navy Yard, 4 Mar 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Edward C. Anderson, Savannah, GA, 7 Mar 1835:

 

        Reports receiving his orders this date and will proceed "by the first opportunity to N.Y."

 

From Assistant Surgeon Robert Woodworth, Albany, NY, 7 Mar 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION and will "comply immediately."

 

From Passed Midshipman Robert Emmett Hooe, Fredericksburg, VA, 7 Mar 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Francis P. Woban, New York, NY, 7 Mar 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman John F. Mercer, New York Navy Yard, 9 Mar 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Montgomery Lewis, Philadelphia, PA, 9 Mar 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Edward C. Anderson, New York, NY, 20 Mar 1835:

 

        Reports he arrived at New York "this morning" and that CONSTITUTION already had sailed.  Awaits further orders.

 

From Passed Midshipman James P. McKinstry, Detroit, MI, 22 Mar 1835:

 

        Renews his request for orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

Vol 2 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1835)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 100, Vol 1 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1835)

 

From Midshipman Oliver Perry Baldwin, New York, NY, 5 Jun 1835:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Charles Hunter, Washington, DC, 19 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Edward C. Anderson, Sandy Hook, NY, [20?] Jun 1835:

 

        Requests his orders to CONSTITUTION "be renewed."

 

From Midshipman Frederick Oakes, Jr., USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests leave of absence for health reasons.  [Annotated to the effect that it is granted and that he is to return to the ship when well.]

 

From Lieutenant John S. Nicholas, New York Navy Yard, 23 Jun 1835:

 

        Reports that CONSTITUTION has arrived and "is now anchored in the North River."

 

From Boatswain Robert Whittaker, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1835:

 

        Reports a problem with his pay and requests resolution.

 

From Passed Midshipman William Radford, New York, NY, 23 Jun 1835:

 

        Had been put ashore at Marseilles for medical reasons earlier in the year, then took advantage of CONSTITUTION's presence in France to report to Commodore Elliott for transport home.  Requests three months leave of absence to complete his recovery.  Is going to Baltimore.  [Leave granted.]

 

From Midshipman Oliver Perry Baldwin, New York, NY, 23 Jun 1835:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to a receiving ship "at present."]

 

From Surgeon Thomas J. Boyd, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests a month's leave of absence.  [Granted.]

 

From Lieutenant F. Ellery, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests detachment for reasons "of a private nature."  [Annotated: "Detach him."]

 

From Midshipman Benjamin Shattuck, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests 3 months leave.  [Annotated: "Detach him." Done, with 3 months leave.]

 

From Midshipman James B. Lewis, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests 3 months leave.  [Detached with 3 months leave.]

 

From Lieutenant G. F. Pearson, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests 1 month's leave.  [Granted, with orders to return to the ship.]

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jun 1835:

 

        After 23 years of service (according to him), he writes: "...A Master in the Navy in active service in a sea going ship, calld [sic] to the daily performance of as important duties, exposed always to the same hardships, and privations, and subject to the same expences [sic] as the other sea officers with whom I mess and associate on board ship, I find myself not only cut off from all the hopes of promotion which are held out to them, but reduced to a level in point of pecuniary compensation, which places my means of support though the necessary claims on these means are precisely and unavoidably the same, in the  extraordinary at least, if not odious relation of 2 to 3 compared with them...

        "...But it is not the smallness of the pay, much, very much as it affects me, that forms the principle [sic] ground of my complaint.  it [sic] is the humiliating relation in which I am made to stand to almost all other classes of officers on board ship.  it [sic] is the sense of degradation which is daily and hourly forced on me by the relation particularly humiliating in which I am made to stand to officers whose duties are not more important, whose efficiency in the discharge of them, I may venture to say is not greater, and who came into the Service years after me.  the [sic] close association in which I am daily & hourly thrown with such officers cannot fail to make the difference of our conditions constantly presest [?] to my mind, I cannot when feated at the mess table fail to feel all the bitterness of of the reflection that these young men though these expenses are exactly the same as mine, secure annually 500 dollars more pay, though their duties are not more important or more faithfully executed they alone secure the natural rewards.  Pardon me if I say, now that no hope remains of any amelioration of this dreadfull [sic] condition from the Legislature that no man of spirit and intelligence can sustain the constant view of such odious and mortifying dispareties [sic] without feeling that he is the subject of studied & deliberate insult, and that with such feelings constantly pursuing him, it must naturally be expected that whatever may be his powers and attainments they cannot fail to perish under its banefull [sic] influence.

        "I trust therefore now that the proximity of hostilities with France are removed, and with it the chances of advancement which might have grown out of it, for it is clear that for me no other chances but such exist.  you [sic] will in consideration of my age, & long service spare me the the [sic] bitter mortification to which I am exposed on board ship, and with equal consideration for the pecuniary embarassment to which the late and violent changes 1) by removal from the Navy yard at Philadelphia & 2d from the order for sea service, have subjected me.  appoint [sic] me to some shore duties, if possible in the neighborhood of Philadelphia, a request which I have made the subject of a public letter transmitted through the commander of this this ship..."  [Annotated that he will be detached if he wishes, but there is no shore position open to him near Philadelphia.]

 

From Midshipman Francis P. Hoban, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests 3 months leave of absence.  [Granted; detached.]

 

From Midshipman William E. Newton, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests 2 months leave.  [Not granted as he has insufficient sea time in grade.]

 

From Lieutenant Edward Rutledge, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jun 1835:

 

        For health reasons, requests detachment on leave of absence.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman Edward C. Anderson, New York, NY, 26 Jun 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman John T. Williams, Gosport Navy Yard, 26 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests permission to travel as passenger on CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Charles Hunter, White Sulphur Springs, VA, 27 Jun 1835:

 

        Reports his change of residence and says if orders to CONSTITUTION have been issued for him they will be forwarded.

 

From Midshipman William Ross Postell, USS HUDSON, 27 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry Darcantel, Philadelphia, PA, 29 Jun 1835:

 

        Again requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Annotated: "...if a vacancy."]

 

From Passed Midshipman Raphael Semmes, Jr., Cincinnati, OH, 29 Jun 1835:

 

        Should either Master in CONSTITUTION wishes relief, he is available.  [Annotated to the effect that he can have orders to the ship, but not for that billet.]

 

From Passed Midshipman John F. Mercer, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests detachment from ship and leave of absence.  [Annotated: "Detach him."]

 

From Midshipman R. Lloyd Tilghman, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Jun 1835:

 

        Requests orders to the Naval School at Gosport, VA.  [So ordered.]

 

From Lieutenant F. Ellery, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Jun 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders detaching him.

 

From Passed Midshipman H. S. Stellwagen, Philadelphia Navy Yard, 29 Jun 1835;

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Annotated: "Leave and order another."]

 

From Chaplain James Everett, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Jun 1835:

 

        Commodore Elliott has approved a 1week leave, but he wants a month.  [Approved.]

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Jun 1835:

 

        Again requests orders to duty in the vicinity of Philadelphia.  [Annotated that action was taken "yesterday."]

 

Roll 101 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Midshipman Francis P. Hoban, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of leave of absence with detachment from the ship.

 

From Passed Midshipman John T. Williams, Gosport Navy Yard, 1 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Jul 1835:

 

        "...under the alternatives it offers, it would not be advisable that I should leave the ship..."  Requests a month's leave to attend to personal affairs, with Commodore Elliott's concurrence.  [Granted.]

 

From Passed Midshipman James P. McKinstry, Detroit, MI, 2 Jul 1835:

 

        Request orders to CONSTITUTION.  Will pay his own travel expenses.  [Ordered to USS EXPERIMENT.]

 

From Midshipman Henry Skipwith, Washington, DC, 2 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Ordered to USS SHARK.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Heywood, New York, NY, 2 Jul 1835:

 

        Understands that Sailing Master Ferguson is detached and requests orders to CONSTITUTION as 1st Master.  [Annotated: "Inform him that Sailing Master Ferguson is still attached..."]

 

From Passed Midshipman W. S. Ringgold, Georgetown, DC, 2 Jul 1835

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or to the Mediterranean Squadron.  [Yes.]

 

From Passed Midshipman J. W. Revere, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Jul 1835:

 

        Request a month's leave for medical reasons.  [Granted.]

 

From Passed Midshipman James F. Duncan, Norfolk, VA, 4 Jul 1835:

 

        Reports that Commodore Elliott had granted him a week's leave due to "extreme ill health" in his family, with permission to request its extension.  Makes that request now.  [Done.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Jul 1835:

 

        "The letter enclosed marked A, I received yesterday from Comr Jesse D. Elliott, whilst I was engaged in paying to the Crew of this Ship, grog money, due to the 30th June ultimo, after accomplishing that duty, I made out a requisition for some monthly returns which, when approved, I immediately took on shore, procured the returns, & returned to the ship for the purpose of executing his order, on Commencing which, I perceived that the printed returns furnished would not answer the object intended, and I then addressed a note to Comr. Elliott (a Copy of which is also enclosed) he was not on board however at a late hour of the night to receive it, and before 9 Oclock this morning, he sent Lieut. Montgomery to me, to say, that I had not obeyed his order respecting the returns and to Consider myself Suspended from duty; I mentioned the reason to Mr. Montgomery why the order was not yet executed, and requested that he would hand to Comr Elliott  the letter I had addressed to him on the Subject, and to shew [sic] him also the inaccuracies of the printed returns to which I referred.

        "The foregoing statement is merely to give the Department a better idea that it had before of the disposition of Comr Elliott towards me, & will shew the Situation in which I have been placed, being on board ship under his Command.‑

        "That alone has prevented my applying to the Department (since the arrival of the Constitution) to be detached from her, was the hope & belief, I, with many others have had, that the present Commander would not be Continued in her, if however this impression be incorrect, I most respectfully beg that you will Consider this my application to be relieved from her, whilst I may add, that with any other Commander I should be pleased to remain attached to the Constitution."  [Annotated: "Letter A not attached nor the copy of the note to Com. E.  Detach him and grant leave of absence for one Month."]

 

From Passed Midshipman P. W. Hunter, Brooklyn Navy Yard, 5 Jul 1835:

 

        Knowing that "several officers have been detached," requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Philip Cortlandt Van Wyck, Mount Pleasant, NJ, 6 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman Charles E. Fleming, New York, NY, 6 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Purser Thomas Breese, Newport, RI, 6 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to USS NORTH CAROLINA and provides a summary of his service to date, which includes:

 

        CONSTITUTION (in ordinary) 14 Dec 1818‑31 Mar 1821

        CONSTITUTION (in commission) 1 Apr 1821‑31 May 1824

 

From Lieutenant Levin Mynn Powell, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Jul 1835:

 

        Forwards copies of the preamble and resolutions adopted by a meeting of the ship's officers relating to the establishment of "a Naval School for the instruction of the junior officers of the Navy" and urging the Secretary's aid and cooperation in bringing it to reality.  He notes that only one of the ship's officers failed to support the recommendation.

 

From Passed Midshipman John F. Borden, Cincinnati, OH, 7 Jul 1835:

 

        "...should a change of officers take place on board the Constitution...", requests orders to her.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant John Cochran, Philadelphia, PA, 10 Jul 1835:

 

        "Having understood that some of the Lieutenants of the U. S. Frigate Constitution are desirous of being detached...", requests orders to her.  [No.]

 

From Midshipman R. N. Lowndes, New York, NY, 10 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of information that he will be detached, and requests to know as early as possible who his replacement is so that he can arrange the transfer of "the private Stores purchased [by me] for the Ship; I have had the misfortune to sail with an officer who took away every means & occasion to deprive me of the advantages which under other Circumstances I should have enjoyed..."

 

From Lieutenant Francis B. Ellison, Baltimore, MD, 11 Jul 1835:

 

        "I am informed that some changes will probably be made in the Officers of the Frigate Constitution...", requests orders to her.  [No.]

 

From Purser Henry Etting, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Jul 1835:

 

        "I will thank you to inform me whether the Commander of a Ship is authorized to order or direct a disbursing officer to advance money or pursers Stores to men who are in debt? & if so, to whom overpayments (arising from this cause) to men who afterward desert from the Service will be charged by the Department?"

 

From Purser John N. Hambleton, St, Michael's, MD, 12 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Purser McLean Buchanan, Philadelphia Navy Yard, 14 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION or CONSTELLATION.  [Not to CONSTITUTION at this time.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Daniel F. Dulany, Fairfax, VA, n. d.:

 

        "Earnestly" requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [In 1837.]

 

From Passed Midshipman P. W. Hunter, Brooklyn, NY, 15 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests a response to his for orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant W. Nicholson, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests to be detached and placed on leave of absence.  [Done.]

 

From Acting Surgeon Isaac Brinckerhoff, USS CONSTITUTION, to Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Jul 1835:

 

        Reports four men unfit for duty:

         

    Musician Samuel Weatherby ‑ erysipelus and swollen legs

    Seaman John Hudson ‑ badly mended broken ribs

    Carpenter's Mate John Jacobs ‑ wrist deformed by dislocation

    Seaman John Vincent ‑ imbecility

 

From Passed Midshipman Edward Middleton, New York, NY, 18 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Heywood, New York, NY, 20 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders as 2nd Master in CONSTITUTION in place of Mr. Berien, who has told him he intends not to sail with the ship.  [No.]

 

From Passed Midshipman William T. Muse, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests a one month leave of absence.

 

From Passed Midshipman James F. Duncan, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Jul 1835:

 

        Regretfully requests detachment from CONSTITUTION due to the extremely delicate health of his family.  [Done.]

 

From Professor of Mathematics Edward Ward, New York, NY, 21 Jul 1835:

 

        In 16 years of teaching mathematics and nautical science to Midshipman, he has frequently had the opportunity of examining the skills of those hired as Schoolmasters on Navy ships, and not once has he found one he considered qualified.

        Until he received quite recently a copy of the resolutions of CONSTITUTION's officers on the subject, he had never gotten around to making any observations to the Department, but now he is inspired to do so.  After delineating his view of the problem and what ought to be required of schoolmaster candidates, he strongly endorses the concept of a Naval School.

 

From Midshipman F. A. Bacon, Centerbury, CT, 21 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to the Mediterranean or West Indies.  [Ordered to CONSTITUTION for later transfer to USS SHARK.]

 

From Carpenter Francis Sagee, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Jul 1835:

 

        Belatedly acknowledges receipt of orders to the ship.

 

From Midshipman Charles E. Fleming, New York, NY, 22 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant J. M. Watson, Washington, DC, 22 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Assistant Surgeon Isaac Brinckerhoff, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests detachment from the ship.  [Done.]

 

From Acting 2nd Master John M. Berrien, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests to be detached from the ship.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon Thomas J. Boyd, Washington, DC, 24 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests a further extension of his leave from CONSTITUTION.  [Granted until 14 Aug.]

 

From Passed Midshipman James L. Henderson, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests to be detached from the ship.  [Done.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Crillon Barton, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests a 3 month leave of absence.  [Commodore Elliott in his endorsement, said he believed the motivation behind the request was a reprimand Barton had received from the 1st Lieutenant, and he recommended against the leave.  SecNav concurred.]

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Hunter, New York, NY, 26 Jul 1835:

 

        Reporting that he has heard Passed Midshipman Henderson is leaving CONSTITUTION, he requests orders to her.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant John Colhoun, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Jul 1835:

 

        Reports having reported for duty this date.

 

From Midshipman James O'Shaughnessy, New York, NY, 27 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Lieutenant John B. Montgomery, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests to be detached from CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, Philadelphia, PA, 29 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests detachment from CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Lieutenant John A. Davis, Washington, DC, 29 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests permission to take passage in CONSTITUTION in order to join USS JOHN ADAMS.  [Ordered to ship.]

 

From Midshipman Edward C. Anderson, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Jul 1835:

 

        Requests a 1 month leave due to his father's health.  [Annotated that he may have the leave and rejoin the ship or he may be detached.]

 

From Assistant Surgeon Victor L. Godon, Philadelphia, PA, 30 Jul 1835:

 

        Acknowledges cancellation of his orders to CONSTELLATION and receipt of new ones to CONSTITUTION.

 

Roll 102, Vol 1 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Sailing Master F. W. Moores, USS HUDSON, 1 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.   Reports his health makes him unfit for sea service, caused by having been struck in the groin by a capstan bar.  [Order revoked.]

 

From Lieutenant John L. Ball, Washington, DC, 1 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry Darcantel, Philadelphia, PA, 1 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION. 

 

From Midshipman John Rutledge, Jr., Charleston, SC, 1 Aug 1835:

 

        With the understanding that Captain Shubrick will be ordered to CONSTITUTION, requests orders there himself.  [Annotated that his information is incorrect and the ship already is fully officered.]

 

From Lieutenant John A. Davis, Washington, DC, 1 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to take passage in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Lieutenant L. M. Powell, Washington, DC, 3 Aug 1835:

 

        Requests to be detached from CONSTITUITION.  [Done.]

 

From Midshipman George T. Sinclair, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Aug 1835:

 

        States his detachment from CONSTITUTION as a result of his guardian's politicking; makes known his desire to remain.  [Detachment revoked.]

 

From Passed Midshipman James L. Henderson, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of detachment orders.

 

From Chaplain James Everett, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Aug 1835:

 

        Reports his return from leave.

 

 From Lieutenant Charles Hunter, Newport, RI, 5 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman Charles Wager, Philadelphia, PA, 5 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Percival Drayton, New York, NY, 5 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Assistant Surgeon Daniel Egbert, ?, 5 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to take passage in CONSTITUTION for later transfer to USS SHARK.

 

From Lieutenant Andrew A. Harwood, Newport, RI, 6 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to take passage in CONSTITUTION for later transfer to USS SHARK, and requests a delay due to pressing personal matters.  [Done.]

 

From Surgeon R. J. Dodd, Frankford, KY, 6 Aug 1835:

 

        When am I to take passage for USS POTOMAC?  [Annotated that he is to go in CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Passed Midshipman George L. Selden, Washington, DC, 8 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Midshipman H. P. Robertson, Philadelphia, PA, 8 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to take passage in CONSTITUTION for later transfer to USS SHARK.

 

From Sailing Master William Vaughn, Sackett's Harbor, NY, 9 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Acting Midshipman Stephen Decatur Trenchard, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Aug 1835:

 

        Requests transfer to "any other ship."  [Annotated: "Already detached."]

 

 From Purser John N. Hambleton, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Aug 1835:

 

        Reports that Commodore Elliott wishes him to take aboard $10,000, half in gold and half in silver.  Half will be Spanish doubloons, which he can procure at $16 the ounce.  Requests instructions as to how to proceed with regard to Spanish milled dollars on which a premium of 3‑4% will be demanded.  Also inquires if he is to provide officers aboard for passage "the customary advance of three months."  [Annotated that he is not to pay a premium of more than 3%, and to advance the money to passengers.]

 

From Midshipman William E. Newton, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Aug 1835:

 

        Requests to be detached from CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Passed Midshipman W. S. Ringgold, Georgetown, DC, 10 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Passed Midshipman Henry Darcantel, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Aug 1835:

 

        On the understanding that Sailing Master Vaughn "will not be able to comply with his orders," requests that, as senior Passed Midshipman aboard, he be ordered as Sailing Master.

 

From Passed Midshipman Bushrod W. Hunter, New York Navy Yard, 13 Aug 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of orders to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Philadelphia, PA, 15 Aug 1835:

 

        "I duly received a letter from John Boyle, Esqr acting Secretary of the Navy bearing date 11th July 1835 enclosing a copy of a letter from Commodore Elliott to the Navy Commissioners dated the 1st July and which had been referred to the Navy Department, requesting that I will 'furnish an explanation on the Several points affecting [my] character and return the Copy with [my] explanation to the Department.'

        "I have attentively read the letter of Commodore Elliott & will bestow on it that careful consideration which a proper respect for myself and the nature of its contents require.  Commodore Elliott is pleased to remark that 'the letter of Mr. Etting is to me one of a very extraordinary character ‑ the origin of his groundless complaints may be discovered by a reference to the Navy Department ‑ they proceed from a disposition to cover his incapacity and delinquency under the pretext of opression {sic} on my part.'  Permit me to call your attention to the following facts ‑ The Frigate Constitution Commanded by Commodore Elliott of which I was the Purser, arrived at New York on the 23rd day of June 1835.  I addressed a letter on the preceeding day to the Commissioners of the Navy, as I felt in duty bound to do, setting forth such causes of complaint in the deportment of the Frigate under my Charge as in my opinion the interests of the Service required should be remedied.  That letter was forwarded by the Navy Commissioners to Commodore Elliott, and on the 1st of July, and in reply to my letter of the 22d of June, the letter of Commodore Elliott was written to which my attention is requested.  Up to this time no application had been made for my removal from the Ship; no complaint of incapacity, nor charge of delinquency preferred to the department against me; but I was, on the Contrary, permitted to continue in the discharge of the duties of my office.  It is true, on the 4th of July, I was suspended on the charge of having disobeyed a specific order, but the order for my suspension had scarcely gone forth before it was withdrawn.‑  It was then, on the 1st of July, and not till then, nine days after the arrival of the Frigate, and when apprized through the Navy Commissioners of my letter, that to quote Commodore Elliott's language, he says, alluding to what he terms 'my groundless complaint' that 'they proceed from a disposition to cover his incapacity & delinquency under the pretext of opression {sic} on my part‑'  I will not cast back the unworthy imputation, but these circumstances will explain where, if at all, it ought to rest.‑  So far, as respects the charges of incapacity & delinquency 'where unsustained by any specification, they are too general and vague to be susceptible of reply.  I will, however, remark that I have served under many Commanders of established character & it is my happiness that such charges are now for the first time preferred & that only by Commodore Elliott.‑  As regards the charges particularly set forth, they are some of them, of grave import, which, if true, should affect my character and should deprive me of my Commission; but which, if unfounded, have injured me grievously {sic} & entitle me to a full vindication of my character, as an Officer, and a Gentleman.  I [?] and earnestly request a full investigation of each & every Charge.

        In compliance with your request I herewith return the copy of the letter from Commodore Elliott to the Navy Commissioners and will proceed to notice the specific allegation {sic} in the order in which they are preferred.‑  In the Copy of Commodore Elliott's letter I have numbered the charges in red ink and beg your attention thereto while I endeavor to meet and I trust successfully to answer them.‑‑

 

No 1  The Charge refers to the space allotted, on board the Constitution, to the Purser for his public and private Stores.

    Explanation.

        The dimensions given of the Room in the Cock Pit, of course to be lessened when it is considered that much of this space is occupied by carlings, shelves &c: that, in the Fore Scuttle, {?} only intended for Tobacco, Soap and articles of that description, as the Spirit room had been contracted [so I was informed] to enlarge the after hold; and  nothing which belonged to {me?} was allowed to be placed there, on the sailing of the Ship, that Commodore Elliott is not correct as to the accommodation afforded me in the Spirit room: but he is right in saying that at least four fifths of the room in the Fore Scuttle were ever occupied by me: and for these reasons:‑ It was in the first instance, nearly all occupied by the store of the Sailmaker and afterwards I was never permitted to have the use of more than one half of this room, the Larboard side of which was given to me, and the Starboard side, to the Sailmaker, who retained it during the cruise.‑  The part I did occupy injured the Stores to such a degree owing to the quantity of water which came in there that I was compelled after several unsuccessfull {sic} attempts by the 1st Lieut, to remedy the evil, to remove all the stores I had placed there; and they were then put into an empty Bread Room about the 1st of June last; Since [sic] which time I have had no stores in the Fore Scuttle.  The department will, therefore, judge of    the accommodation allowed to the Purser on board the Constitution‑  Commodore Elliott is not correct in stating that there were Four Store rooms in the Cock Pit filled at Boston: there were originally but three filled as State Rooms, the fourth was fitted as a store room, nor is Commodore Elliott Correct in  stating that I filled any room in the Cock Pit with shelves for the reception of my articles & I would ask if Commodore Elliott granted permission to Lieut Carpenter to occupy two rooms in the cock Pit what  room besides the Store room then occupied by me could he have intended.‑  Commodore Elliott's wine room, as he calls it, which he gave as a substitute, is two feet nine inches in width and I would beg leave to state that none of Mr. Livingston's Stores, though he had a great many were put into the store room in the Cock Pit.‑  The Fore Magazine and the Birth {sic} Deck were appropriated for that purpose.

 

No 2  This Charge refers to the purchase of good by me from an English Pilot Boat on              the Coast of France

    Explanation

        The inconvenience to which I had been subjected by the want of apartments was in a slight degree removed after the ship arrived on the Coast of France, by the issue of clothing, which had been made from the Store Room; this enabled me, though at much inconvenience, to purchase some stores.  The Considerable quantity of Broadcloth; & Linen, which Commodore Elliott says, I introduced on board was Eighteen pieces of the Cloths and Sixteen pieces of Irish Linen.‑  Not a piece or a yard of the latter was issued on board though the Officers would have taken it all.‑  Even the Cloth for a long time I   refused to let them have having reason to believe it would expose me to painful animadversion on the part of Commodore Elliott.‑  Commodore Elliott is not correct in stating that I purchased these goods under a strong remonstrance from his 1st Lieut: on  the contrary his 1st Lieut or rather as I should express it the 1st Lieut of the Ship seemed pleased that Mr Woodyear had bought them.‑  The 1st Lieut and the Commanding Officer of the Ship at the time, and clearly, nothing could have been introduced on          board against his approbation.  If I remember rightly the Ship was {word obscured} too to take these goods on board, at any rate, they were hoisted in by his order or permission.‑  The goods referred to were purchased on the 23d of April, the day             before Commodore Elliott returned from Paris, and the order which he says was issued on his return from Paris and which he extracts from the log book of 24th April, was not given to me till the 29th of this month; nor was this order on the log book, seen by the Officer who signed the remarks for the watch which contain it, till exhibited to him by me since the ship's arrival at New York.  That Commodore Elliott was not over anxious to have certificates of the kind suggested will appear evident from the Certificate submitted herewith [marked A.] {sic}  As an apology for procuring the certificate I must urge the peculiar disposition Commodore Elliott had manifested towards me.  The emoluments resulting from the purchase of Stores is {sic] a legitimate perquisite of the grade of Officer to which I belong.‑

 

No 3  This Charge refers to the Smallness in the Supply of Slops and Stores in my epartment received on board the Frigate Constitution while at Boston.‑

    Explanation:

        Commodore Elliott is not correct, in stating that the deficiencies of apartments was urged by me as an excise for the smallness of the Supply of Slops received in my department of the Ship when at Boston.  In proof of this I refer to a copy of my letter to the Navy Commissioners herewith submitted [marked B] and if I omitted any part of my duty at Boston The Honble Secretary of the Navy was fully apprized by me in several communications shewing (sic} the impracticability of my attending the duties of the ship previously to her Sailing from Boston at the same time I was called on to perform at that Station duties which in other Stations are devolved on two officers of my grade.  It was obviously my interest to have a full supply of every thing that could be required.‑  At New York I might have purchased many stores had I been allowed a place in which to put them.  My letter to the Commissioners of the Navy [marked B.] {sic} above referred to will corroborate my statement.

 

No 4  This Charge refers to my not furnishing Commodore Elliott with a private letter which i had received from Mr Vincent, a merchant in Norfolk, previously to the Sailing of the Frigate Constitution and to the supplanting Government Slops by the receipt of certain articles on board that Ship.

    Explanation:

        The letter in question, it will be perceived, is not alleged to contain any charge against me & neither does {words obscured} my Character; and was entirely private in its nature.  The right of Commodore Elliott to demand a copy of such a letter may well be questioned.  At the time he requested it, it could not immediately be found.  It has since been found and is now in my possession and if in the opinion of the department, it is proper that it should be produced, I certainly can have no hesitation in placing at its disposition.  Commodore Elliott says 'he [meaning myself] informs me that Mr ?} will call upon him for it.'  Is it characteristic of a manly mind to deal in indirect imputation?  I feel that this requires no further notice.  Commodore Elliott gave me permission however to purchase Sheeting from Mr Vincent and observed that I could have it sent to New York for me.  I beg leave to refer you to letters on this subject herewith submitted [marked C.D.E. & F.] [sic]  I would here remark that the letter to me [marked E] did not advise me that he wanted a Copy of the letter from Mr Vincent in order that he might shew [sic] it to the Commissioners.  The sheeting from Mr Vincent is charged at 24 1/2 Cents per yard: whether this be at a treble advance as Commodore Elliott asserts it will be for the Commissioners to judge.  Commodore Elliott must have known that all articles sold by the purser are for his private emolument.

 

No 5      This Charge refers to my answering a letter from the American Consul at Cowes received by Commodore Elliott at Plymouth.

    Explanation

         This letter was not a llittle extraordinary in its Character considering that it was addressed by a Consul at an English port to an American Commodore he being in a Frigate on the Coast of France instructing him as to the duties, & questioning the propriety of the course adopted by the Ship under his command.  It was natural that the purser of the Ship should feel some surprise on the duty of answering such a communication being devolved on him.‑  The circumstances respecting the letter of the Consul to Commodore Elliott are these [of which letter a copy is in the possession of the Navy Commissioners. . . [in the original]   Commodore Elliott employed a man named Edwd Milligan who was, I believe, the master of the vessel from which I bought the goods of Mr Woodyear.  He was employed to pilot the Constitution from Havre to Cowes or Portsmouth but the wind not permitting the ship to go into either of these ports she bore away for Cherbourg and the discharged Milligan [See copy of his receipt annexed marked H.] {sic}  His charge for the days detention was Seventy five dollars.Commodore Elliott wrote & sent to the Consul at Cowes, to enquire respecting this charge.  The letter referred to from the Consul to Commodore Elliott was received through Mr Woodyear the purport and substance of which as near as I can recollect is here given, to wit.

        'I think Milligan has charged too much ‑ pay him [blank] dollars in addition to what he has received and then he will be fairly and properly paid ‑ his vessel is known on the coast as a Smuggler and it appears Singular to me that you should employ any ther persons to supply your Ship when it could be done and ought to be done through the Consul.  It is the duty of Commanders of vessels of War of the United States who come to this Coast to Communicate with the Consul.  In this instance I have heard of your wants, which you have carefully concealed from me, through Mr Woodyear a clothier at Cowes, who called upon me to ask for my commands & said that he was going over to France to furnish the Constitution with supplies.  I would caution you Sir, against dealing with persons of whose character you have no knowledge‑' 

        The foregoing, to the best of my recollection, is the substance of the letter of the Consul at Cowes; it is evident that he was disappointed in not furnishing the Ship himself.  It is not a little singular that an American Consul should permit these smugglers as he terms them to have intercourse with him and with a Frigate of the United States without giving notice to the authorities of the place‑  I would remark that purchases by a purser may be from any individual and had the Ship been at Cowes the Consul would not necessarily have been employed by the purser to make purchases for him‑  Of course it will not be expected that I should, after this, answer a letter on behalf of Commodore Elliott.

 

No 6    This Charge refers to my having knowingly dealt with and purchased Goods from a Smuggler, with a view to benefitting myself and violate the revenue laws.

    Explanation:

        This charge is indeed a weighty one,,and if there is guilt on the part of any one, calls for an example.  How Stands the Case?  On the 23d of April 1835 Mr Woodyear, who had written to me from Cowes, [See his letter herewith submitted marked J.] [sic] came on board the Constitution when off Havre with some stores which he said he had brought to sell me‑ On reporting this to the 1st Lieut of the Ship the articles referred to were received on board and most of them were purchased by me‑  Some were taken by   other Officers‑ A list of Most which I purchased has already been furnished to the Commissioners of the Navy.‑  The articles I purchased were such as are commonly used on board, some of them only samples of articles of which there were none on board at the time.  I took out in the Constitution fewer store [sic] than were ever before to my knowledge taken in a Frigate in our Navy.‑  After paying for these goods Mr Woodyear, who had been entertained at the Ward Room mess Table, left the Ship to return to Cowes, but Milligan the reported Smuggler who came with him was kept on board by     Commodore Elliott as a pilot for the Constitution‑ Commodore Elliott shews [sic] that, however others may have been ignorant, that he did know the Character of the vessel to be such as the Consul represents, and with this knowledge and after the date of the order on the log book 24th of April he himself introduced into the Ship a number of articles from the same vessel and from the same person from whom I had purchased on the 23d of April.  These goods I paid for by his order May 5th eleven days after the date of my purchase, [See bill annexed marked K.] nor [sic] nor did Commodore Elliott receive these goods when first brought along side the ship by mr Woodyear, but gave him to understand so Mr Woodyear informed me that they should be received on board so soon as it could be done without offending the authorities at Cherbourg, and they were accordingly taken on board so soon as the Ship had left the Port.  Woodyears vessel in the mean time had been cruising in sight of the Ship.‑ On the conduct of Commodore Elliott in charging me with dealing with a Smuggler under these circumstances it does not become me to pronounce judgement.

 

No 7    This Cannot be Considered a Charge but refers to an order issued by Commodore Elliott directing certain articles to be served out as the Slop advance

    Explanation:

        The order which Commodore Elliott here refers to is dated June 11th nearly two months after the articles were purchased and only a few days before the return of the Ship to New York.  None of the linen however was served out & no cloth to the Crew excepting that which I was compelled to issue by Commodore Elliott's order [See letter to Lieutenant Montgomery marked M.]  In reply to which Commodore Elliott sent me word by Lieut Montgomery that the boys were not much in debt at any rate to serve the Cloth [See letter and voucher annexed marked N. & O.] [sic]

 

No 8    This Charge referes to my not having received on board the Constitution some Blue Cotton then in store at the Navy Yard at Boston for which Commodore Elliott had signed a requisition.

    Explanation:

        I must again remark that Commodore Elliott is not correct. I did receive the Blue Cotton then in store [See Store Keepers Acct herewith marked P.]  and I beg leave to state that the list of Slops and Stores received on board & exhibited by me to  Commodore Elliott and by him approved & countersigned also Shews [sic] the receipt of these Cottons on board the Ship, as well a [omitted word] of the quantity of nankeen and Black Silk Hdkfs on board and which Commodore Elliott after approving forbade me to issue [See paper annexed marked K].  I must also remark that Commodore Elliott is not  correct when he says I introduced on board a large quantity of nankeens the paper last referred to will shew there were but seventy pieces of nankeen, not half the number usually taken in a Sloop of War.‑ Some of these nankeens are Still on board.‑

 

No 9     Commodore Elliott says this is what the purser calls 'persecution'

    Explanation:

        The purser no where uses the word persecution.  It is of Commodore Elliotts election, and it is not my province to question its application.

 

No 10    This refers to the Cost of the Monkey Jackets

    Explanation:

        It is true that this is no concern of mine but as Commodore Elliott's statement respecting it is not correct it may be my duty to furnish information.  I therefore beg leave to refer you to the Cost of the woolen article in the Store Keeper's Account annexed [marked P.] and to letter [marked S] of the Cost of the India rubber.‑

 

No 11.    This Charge would seem to impute to me extortion.

    Explanation:

        No such charge is sustained as is shewn by [word obscured] approved by Commodore Elliott to the bills of purchase.  If it be true as Commodore Elliott suggests that by keeping the Ship indebted to the men, a disposition to desert will be in a great degree obviated why did Commodore Elliott in direct violation of the law compel me to advance money to every man on board the Constitution whether in debt or not [See letters annexed marked T & U.] and why against my strong remonstrance did Commodore Elliott compel me to issue Slops to persons known to him to be in debt & this too only a few days before the arrival of the Ship, [See letters marked M & N.]  Some of whom are included among fifty of the Crew and upward, who have deserted from the Constitution since March last.‑‑

        And why, did Commodore Elliott on the 28 or 29th of April last permit a number of persons to come from Cherbourg and dispose of sundry articles of            Merchandise &c to the Crew of the Ship in direct violation of the laws or regulations of the Navy which say 'no suttler [sic] shall be allowed on board our Ships of war.'  Although the above is put in the shape of an interrogation the facts amply warrant the same.‑

        I have in conclusion, Sir, to express the hope that the Department will not suffer me to remain in doubt as to the light in which my conduct is to be perceived but will cause such an investigation to be made, as if guilty, may subject me to deserved        prosecution and punishment, but if innocent will repair the wrong which has been done me."

 

[ENCLOSURES]     

 

Commodore Jesse D. Elliott to Commodore John Rodgers, BNC, 1 Jul 1835:

 

        "The communication from the Navy Comrs office of the 25th inst enclosing a copy of a letter from Henry Etting, Purser of this ship and bearing date the 22nd inst was duly recd and I hasten to give the explanations which that letter may seem to require. I have caused the dimensions of the Apartments on board this ship which its Purser has appropriated to his own use, to be correctly taken.  His storeroom in the Cockpit measures 12 feet, 7 inches in length, 6 feet in width, and five in height.  That in the fore scuttle is 5 ft 4 in from the deck to the skin, 3 feet 5 in to kelson [sic] and 4 feet between the bulkheads extending from side to side.  Also every accommodation in the after hold and Spirit room have been afforded.  The stores room in the fore peak has been used by him for articles required in the monthly and quarterly servings, and that in the cockpit for those of immediate requirement, and at least four fifths of the former unoccupied by him.  There are in the Cockpit of this Ship four state rooms, one for each Asst Surgeon, one for the professor of Mathematics, and the remaining one for the Clerk of the Commander.  Such was the arrangement at the Boston Dock Yard.  Upon a representation made to me, at that station (thro' the first Lt of the Yard) that he should require two rooms in the Cock Pit, I granted him permission to occupy that number but under a misapprehension, he took possession of the State Room of the Clerk, and fitted it with shelves for the reception of his articles.  I was ignorant of this until after the departure of the Ship, when upon information of the fact, I ordered the fixtures to be removed and the room to be restored to its original condition.

        "For reasons hereinafter mentioned, I have caused this apartment to be measured, its length is six feet, width five feet three inches and height five feet nine inches.

        "Having deprived the Purser of this, I gave him my Wine Room in the Cockpit as a substitute, which on the outward passage, for the accommodation of my own stores and those which I anticipated would be brought on board by Mr Livingston, I was also compelled to take from him.

        "The letter of Mr Etting is to me one of a very extraordinary character.  The origin of his groundless complaints may be discovered by a reference to the Navy Department.  They proceed from a disposition to cover his incapacity and delinquency under the pretext of oppression on my part.

        "Notwithstanding the inconvenience to which he asserts, he has been subjected by the want of apartments, he on the Coast of France, without my knowledge and under strong remonstrance from my 1st Lt, introduced on board from an English Pilot Boat a considerable quantity of Broad Cloths and Linens.  On my return from Paris, I issued the  following orders, which I extract from the Log Book of this Ship 'The articles received on board this day (April 24th) will be returned unless proper certificates  are obtained from the Custom House officers at Cowes, shewing that they are legally brought on board, in which case they may be retained & issued to the officers and crew.'

        "The plea of want of room by the Purser did not then prevent the purchase of articles the introduction of which would be to supplant those of the Government.

        "The deficiency of apartments is again urged by the Purser as an excuse for the smallness of the supply of articles of Slops and stores received in his department of this Ship at Boston.  He had at that time, by his own shewing, two apartments in the Cockpit, and if he was deprived of one afterwards, it will not avail him as a justification for his delinquency in furnishing an adequate supply for the ship at the t ime of her departure.

        "Previous to his or my appointment to the Constitution, Mr Etting exhibited to me at the Boston station, a letter from Mr Vincent of Norfolk containing a statement of articles which he (Mr V) had furnished the Delaware and Potomac at the same time expressing his wish that the same articles should be introduced on board the Constitution.  I have requested Mr Etting to furnish me with a copy of that letter in order that I might shew to the Commissioners the extent to which the Government slops are supplanted by the introduction of articles at treble advance and for the private emolument of the Purser.  He informs me that the letter is lost or mislaid.  Whether it be so or not, I hope the Commrs will call upon him for it.  I enclose to the Commrs a copy of a letter marked A from the American Consul at Cowes, received by me at Plymouth when the Ship was under weigh.  I coould not then reply to it, but early in the passage to the U. S. I requested the Purser to make the reply.  Since my arrival I addressed a note a copy of which is enclosed marked B requesting a copy of his answer to the letter of the American Consul, but for the frivolous reasons stated in his note herewith enclosed (marked C) my request has not been complied with.  The unexpected information which the letter of the Consul contains, served to confirm the opinion I had previously formed of the character of the vessel from which Mr Etting introduced the articles, when on the Coast of France and of the object of his purchase.  A copy of the list of those articles and their cost and issuing price is herewith enclosed marked (D).  In addition to the order above extracted from the Log Book, I issued another to the Purser directing those articles to be served out at the Slop advance.  I would here remark that at the Boston Station I signed for this Ship a request for a quantity of Blue Cottons then in store at the Navy Yard, but they were not received on board by Mr Etting, although there was room enough for a 98.  Yet I find a large quantity of nankins [sic] introduced on board, and also a quantity of blk silk Hkfs, all at his private advance and which I forbade to be issued to the crew.  This is what the Purser calls persecution.  The monkey Jackets were of India Rubber & at a cost of about half the woolen article and designed for the use of the petty officers.

        "I feel it my duty, Gentlemen, to protect the crew from extortion, and by keeping the Ship indebted to the Men a disposition to desert will in a great degree be obviated.  I would respectfully recommend to the Commrs [words obscured] whole served out to the crew of our Ships should be specified by name in their accounts, in order that every man may know with what he has been charged.  A necessity still exists of introducing into the service further regulations defining and circumscribing the power which Pursers possess of taking advantage of their official stations for the purposes of private speculation, as also to provide some preventative against the introduction of articles to supplant the Government Slops."

 

A.  Statement of George Woodyear, 5 May 1835:

 

        "On the afternoon of the 3d May 1835, when the Boat which brought me and my goods from Cowes was alongside the Frigate Constitution, bound to Havre, I requested Mr Etting to dispatch me soon as possible, that he would oblige me by receiving & paying me at once for such articles as Comre Elliott was willing to purchase, that I was anxious to go, as the Ship was advancing rapidly towards Havre.

        "Mr Etting remarked that he did not know that Comre Elliott would be willing to purchase or receive any of my articles; at least till the proper certificates of regular clearance at Cowes was produced, not only of the goods I had with me, but of those I had previously sold to him, as there was some difficulty on board the Ship respecting them;and the letter which he had addressed to me a day or two since, by order of Comre Elliott, called for the Certificates from the custom House of the Clearance of these goods.  Mr Etting then advised my speaking with Comre Elliott on the subject, & afterwards to inform him of the result; I immediately saw Comre Elliott & returned & told Mr Etting that there was no difficulty about recg my goods, that comre Elliott when I went to speak to him about the Clearance of the goods, said 'never mind that, Mr Woodyear, it is of no consequence your word is sufficient that all is right your goods shall be received & paid for Sir.'"

 

B.  Letter of Henry Etting to the BNC, 24 Mar 1835:

 

        "Herewith I have the Honor to enclose to you  an inventory of the Slop Clothing received on board the Ship at Boston, Mass. and also a list of the resale stores in my department, want of time prevented my transmitting  these previous to my leaving the united States.

"P. S. I would respectfully remark, that the Sixteen hundred suits of Blue Cotton Clothing and one hundred & fifty India Rubber Coats, ordered for this Ship at Boston, were not finished at the time of her leaving the port, & it is no doubt proper I should mention that it was out of my power (from causes which will hereafter be made known to you) to provide as Customary, a supply of private Stores for the wants of the crew."

 

C.  Note from Henry Etting to Commodore Elliott, 24 Jun 1835:

 

        "The sheeting (as per sample exhibited to you) which I purchased from Mr Vincent by your permission to serve to the Crew of this Ship as Pursers Stores, which arrived at New York about the time of our sailing, has been even Since, and is now in Store there as an expense to me; I therefore respectfully ask permission to have it brought on board this Ship to be issued to the Crew."

 

D.  Note from Commodore Elliott to Henry Etting, 28 Jun 1835:

 

        "I acknowledge the receipt of your letter in relation to the introduction of Duck; I recollect that you submitted to me at the Boston Station, a letter in reference to the same matter, will you be pleased to furnish me with a Copy of that letter."

 

E.  Note from Elliott to Etting, 29 Jun 1835:

 

        "Be pleased to furnish me with the [word obscured] and quantity of the articles which you wish to introduce into the Ship; as furnished by Mr Vincent of Norfolk."

 

F.  Note from Elliott to Etting, 4 Jul 1835:

 

        "Your letter in relation to the Quantity of Sheeting was not recd this morning.  I expressly forbid the introduction of this article on board this Ship, evidently designed to supplant the articles furnished by the Government."

 

H.  Receipt from Edward Milligan, 24 Apr 1835:

 

        "For service on board the U. S. Frigate Constitution being employed at Havre as Pilot for the Harbour of Cowes

                            Spanish $75

        "Received U. S. Frigate Constitution April 24th 1835 Off Cherbourg of Henry Etting, purser, Twenty five dollars on acct of the above‑ the balance, to say Fifty dollars, to be paid me by Robert Hunter Esqr American Consul at Cowes, agreeably to a Certificate of Comre Jesse D. Elliott of  this date."

 

J.  Note from George Woodyear to Henry Etting, 12 Apr 1835:

 

        "I have taken the liberty of soliciting your favors for my supplies you may be in want of having on several occasions supplied U. S. Ships bound to the Mediterranean.the [sic] last ship the Delaware, I furnished supplies when off Cherbourg, and have since forwarded a large Quantity to Gibraltar, for which I have Mr Thornton's testimonials.  I have annexed a few of the articles Supplied the Delaware.  Should you favor me with an order I will bring them to Havre, or forward them direct to Gibraltar.  The Southampton Steam Packet will leave Havre on Tuesday Evening the 14th at 9 OClock when your reply will oblige."

 

K.  Bill of George Woodyear, 3 May 1835:

 

        "For the following articles purchased May 3d 1835 by order of Come Jesse D. Elliott for the use of the U. S. Frigate Constitution.

    "viz

Twelve Dozen Half Hose at $3

36.00

Four Dozen Drawers at $12

48.00

Four Dozen [?] at $12

48.00

Twenty One pair Cotton drawers at 50 cwt

11.55

Eight Yew Jackets @ $7.50

60.00

Thirty five Monkey Jackets a $3

105.00

One hundred pair Shoes at $1.75

175.00

Forty five Cotton Shirts @ $1.25

50.00

Thirty nine Cotton Shirts @ $1.12 1/2

44.24

Forty Blue Cloth Jackets @ $6

240.00

Forty Blue Cloth Trowsers @ $4

100.00

Forty Blue Cloth Vests @ $2.50

160.00

Three Monkey Jackets @ $3

9.00

[Total}

$1086.79

"Received U. S. Frigate Constitution Off Havre May 5th 1835 of Henry Etting, purser, Ten hundred Eighty Six Spanish dollars & Seventy nine Cents in full of the above bill."

 

L.  Note from Elliott to Etting, 11 Jun 1835:

 

        "All articles (not included in the Commissioners Regulations) introduced on board this Ship since her departure from the United States, to represent the article of Slops, you will serve out at the Slop advance."

 

M.  Note from Etting to Lieutenant John Montgomery, 15 Jun 1835;

 

        "The Boys in the Ship are generally rated 2d class at six dollars per mo., & came on board 1st March, overpaid Two & Three mos., which, with the supplies they have recd from me, leaves them of course still in debt.  I should not therefore willingly make advances of purser's stores to them, the Ship being bound to a port in the U. States, at which we expect she will arrive within a week; private Stores, issued to the crew you are aware, are at my own risk."

 

N.  Note from Etting to Montgomery, 15 Jun 1835:

 

        "As I feel unwilling to incur any risk by advances to the men or Boys on board the Ship who are in debt, except of necessaries (which I never deny them) you will do me a favor by asking Come Elliott if he will receive on the Government acct, the Cloth as I purchased it, which he has ordered me to issue to the Crew, the issue of which, will then be at the risk of the Government and not at mine; I am the more particular as the opportunity for desertion will soon be offered to the Crew; the inducement for which I need not say to you, is increased, with those who are in debt."

 

"remark.  In reply to the above Come Elliott said ‑ he would take from me as suggested so much Cloth as was required see Lieut Mongomery's certificate marked O."

 

O.  Lieutenant Montgomery's "certificate" (receipt):

 

"1835

March 18

14 lbs Soup for Coppers @ 10 cts

1.40

March 31

14 lbs Soup for Coppers @ 10 cts

1.40

April     1

3 Tin Pots @ 25 cts

 .75

April     7

7 lbs Soup @ 10 cts

.70

May    16

20 1/4 lbs Soup @ 10 cts

2.02

June     3

9.4 lbs Soup @ 10 cts

.97

June    3

1 Tin Pot

.25

June    3

20 lbs Sugar for Hos Dept @ 14 cts

2.80

June  16

52 Yard Blue Cloth @ $2.50

130.00

July      3

16 Yard Muslin

3.00

July      6

16 1/4 lbs Soup @ 10 cts

1.63

[Total]

One hundred forty four 92/100 Dollars ($144.92)

 

The Fifty two yards of Cloth Charged 16th June 1835 in  the above bill at Two 50/100 dollars per yard were purchased from Purser Etting & issued on board the Constitution as Public Slops by my Order.

 

This will Certify that the different items in the above bill with the exception of the Sugar & the Cloth were drawn from Purser Etting for the use of the Ship, and through me, Come Elliott directed that the Cloth should be received from Purser Etting, as public Slops, and issued for the Hospital depart[ment] of the Ship on requisition  of the Surgeon.

 

P.  Bill of Storekeeper George Bates, Boston Navy Yard, Feb 24, 1835, for Slop Clothing for CONSTITUTION:

 

12 Blue Cloth Trowsers @ $3

36.00

188 Blue Cloth Trowsers @ $3

658.00

8 Blue Cloth Jackets @ $4

32.00

192 Blue Cloth Jackets @ $4.50

883.50

6 Pair Duck Trowsers @ 50 cts

3.00

204 Pair Duck Trowsers @ 60 cts

176.40

8 Pair Blue Cotton Trowsers @ 65 cts

5.20

242 Pair Blue Cotton Trowsers @75 cts

181.50

300 Duck Frocks @ 66 cts

198.00

60 Pea Jackets @ $5.40

324.00

100 Blankets @ $1.10

110.00

30 Mattresses @ $3.18

95.40

500 Blk Silk Hdkfs @ 55 cts

275.00

500 Pair Shoes @ 95 cts

475.00

500 Flannel Shirts @ $1.20600.00

[Total]

$4052.70"

 

R.  List of Slops received on board Frigate Constitution, n. d., approved by J. D. Elliott:

 

"200 Blue Cloth Trowsers

200 Blue Cloth Jackets

300 Duck Frocks

300 Duck Trowsers

250 Blue Cotton Trowsers

500 Flannel Shirts

60 Pea Jackets

100 Blankets

54 Mattresses

500 Blk Silk Hdks

500 Pair Shoes

100  Pr. Stockings

100 Flannel Drawers

--

 

List of Pursers Stores recd on board Frigate Constitution

[Items}

 Price

2591 lbs Seamans Tobacco

.38

370 lbs Officers Tobacco

.75

17,000 Cigars

18.00 (.22/doz.)

5,000 Cigars

15.00 (.18/doz.)

1177 2/3 lbs Hyson Tea

1.05

60 lbs Black Tea

.94

5 Pair India Rubber

5.00

200 Boxes India Paste

.14

4259 lbs Sugar

.15

400 Tin pans

.25

328 Tin Pots

.25

25 pieces Blk Silk Hdkfs

.55

20 pieces Pocket Hdkfs

1.00

70 pieces Blue Nankeens

1.25

24 pair Sheeting Trowsers

1.25

1625 lbs Soap

.14

72 Doz Table Spoons

 10

200 Scrub Brushes

.31

312 Cannisters Mustard

.31

10 Doz Red Pepper

.20

20 Doz Black Pepper

.20

12 1/2 Doz Fine Combs

.25

9 Doz Dressing Combs

.25

96 Doz Linen Tape

.07

352 lbs Thread

1.25

72 Doz Jack Knives

.31

12 Doz Jack Knives

.37

3000 Needles

.10 per paper

90 Pieces Blk Ribbon

.75

4 Razor Strops

.45

6 Doz Scissors

.30

 

S.  Note from George Bates to Henry Etting, 4 Aug 1835:

 

        "The Pea Jackets of India Rubber shipped to New York for the Constitution were Charged at Five dollars each."

 

T.  Letter from Etting to Montgomery, 28 Apr 1835:

 

        "The orders of Come Elliott given to me yesterday through you 'to pay in addition to the grog money which might be due, the sum of two dollars to every man in the Ship whether in debt or not' have been complied with, with the exception, that the marines received but one dollar instead of two ‑ the Marine Officer ‑ Mr Hardy representing to Come Elliott that it would be sufficient, and obtaining his permission to pay them that Sum, and I would state that some of the mess boys have not yet received what is to be paid to them, but will be paid tomorrow when it is ascertained how much is to be allowed them.

        "As these orders were verbal altogether, I will thank you to state whether I have executed them according to the intention and orders of Come Elliott."

 

"Note: Lieut Montgomery declined affixing his name to the above, but said that if necessary, he would at any time testify to it."

 

U.  Note to 4th Auditor from Henry Etting, 22 Jun 1835:

 

        "I will thank you to inform me whether the Commander of a Ship is authorized to order or direct a disbursing officer to advance money or pursers Stores to men who are in debt?  and [sic] if so, to whom over payments (arising from this cause) to men who afterward desert from the service will be charged by the department?"

 

From Midshipman Thomas S. McDonough, Utica, NY, 19 Aug 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION, or to NORTH CAROLINA if CONSTITUTION has her full complement of officers.   [No.]

 

From Sailing Master James Ferguson, New York Navy Yard, 20 Aug 1835:

 

        "...By referring to the list of expenses under the head of pilotage of all our public ships who have visited the ports in the upper part of the English Channel previously to the 'Constitution' under the command of Commo. Elliott, there will be found a heavy charge for Channel pilotage, this charge was saved to the Government in the case of the Constitution by the reliance the Commo. had on my experience, in which as is well known he was not deceived.  I trust that in the service I rendered on this occasion the Government will find an additional reason to save me from any expense that might with propriety be assumed by itself."

 

Roll 102, Vol 2 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1835)

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Philadelphia, PA, 4 Sep 1835:

 

        Asks whether or not his report of 15 Aug 1835 has been received.

 

From Purser Henry Etting, Philadelphia, PA, 5 Sep 1835:

 

        Acknowledges receipt of the Secretary's acceptance of his report, but is disappointed that no further enquiry has been thought necessary.  Requests a court of inquiry or court martial to officially clear his name.  [Annotated that the SecNav has every confidence in him and that official proceedings are not possible due to Commodore Elliott's absence overseas.]

 

Roll 103, Vol 1 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Lieutenant Oscar Bullus, Boston, MA, 22 Oct 1835:

 

        Requests orders to CONSTITUTION in accordance with the expressed desires of Commodore Elliott; suggests he can "go out" in NORTH CAROLINA.  [Yes.]

 

Vol 2 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1835)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 3 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Carpenter John Dickason, Charlestown, MA, 28 Dec 1835:

 

        Reports expiration of leave, but "...as I still labour under a severe Hernia for which I was detached from the Constitution," requests another three months' leave.  [Granted.]

 

Roll 104, Vol 1 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

From Passed Midshipman Edward Middleton, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Jan 1836:

 

        Requests a 1 year leave to travel the continent.  [Approved for the end of the cruise.]

 

 Vol 2 (February 1 ‑ 29, 1836)

 

From Passed MIdshipman J. W. Revere, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Feb 1836:

 

        Requests a 1 year leave to travel on the continent.  [Approved for the end of the cruise.]

 

Roll 105, Vol 1 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

From Surgeon William P. C. Barton, Philadelphia, PA, 20 Mar 1836:

 

        Forwards letters from Fleet Surgeon Boyd and Passed Midshipman William S. Ringgold, both in CONSTITUTION, recounting details of a duel fought in Smyrna (Izmir), Turkey, by Passed Midshipmen Barton (the writer's son) and Wood.  Barton, wounded in the affair, and his second, Ringgold, both have been placed under arrest by Commodore Elliott.  The principal reason for the present letter is to bring to the Secretary's attention the severe handling imposed on Barton by the Commodore.

 

[Enclosures]

 

From Passed Midshipman William S. Ringgold to Surgeon Barton, Philadelphia, PA, 5 Dec 1835:

 

        "I regret to inform you, your Son was a few days since, severely wounded in a duel with Mr Wood, Pass Mid, in the leg.  The quarrel I believe is one of an old standing, but brought to this unhappy termination by his being ordered to the Schooner Shark where Mr Wood was, who refused to mess with him and I regret to say the rest of the mess followed his example.  This together with other insults left him no other recourse, but to call him out: when after receiving two fires, his pistol missing fire both times, had his leg fractured by the second shot.  I am indeed happy to say Sir, that your son's conduct on the field evinced that coolness and determination which always emanate from a good cause, and every person acquainted with the circumstances is of the opinion of myself that the course he pursued could not be avoided without dishonor.  I and the Surgeon who attended deemed it necessary for him to be brought on board of this vessel to have the ball extracted rather than on the schooner.  He was accordingly broughton board and the ball extracted with no difficulty; during this time Com. Elliott was absent from the ship and as soon as he returned the thing was of course reported by the 1st Lieut.  You cannot judge our surprise to hear the order given that 'Mr Barton should be immediately taken on board of the Shark,' this order being issued without knowing what the consequence might be.  Dr Boyd the Surgeon of the Ship immediately waited upon him  and protested in the strongest terms against this inhuman order, but he would not be heard by the Come. [sic] who said he must go and he would bear the responsibility.  He was therefore hoisted over the side and sent back to the Schooner.  You sir as a medical gentleman can imagine what his suffering must have been, labouring under excitement from opium and such inhumane treatment.  Through Dr Boyd's intercession he was removed on shore yesterday where he will receive all the attention & care which he requires in his present condition.  Before your son was ordered on board the schooner her Capt. knowing the difference between them told the Commdr he was afraid that this would be the result of their being together.  All the parties are now suspended and the Com. has threatened to report them to the Sec. of the Navy."

 

From Surgeon Thomas J. Boyd to Surgeon Barton, 31 Jan 1836:

 

        "I promised Midshipman Barton to inform you by the first opportunity of his condition.  We left him at Smyrna on the 5th inst doing well in every respect.  The ball wound had healed, the circular opening which was made for the extraction of the Ball was still discharging.  The only obstacle to a speedy recovery was a fragment of the Tibia which was exfoliating but not sufficiently detached to be removed by incision.  This fragment had been put in its place at the first dressings and i believe would have united as did the others had not Mr Barton been subjected, against my urgent remonstrance, to removal.  The ball traversed the Tibia in its upper third fracturing it transversely & splintering it longitudinally and lodged posteriorly to it [word obscured] the gastroenemia [?].  The entrance of the Ball being on the front could not give vent to the discharge & I therefore cut down to the Ball, removed it & dressed the incision so as to heal it by the first intention if nature should consolidate the bone without producing any suppuration in the soft parts or to secure as an outlet against any accumulation that might form in the inflammatory stage.  The slivers were thrown off favourably & no accidents occurred.  The Tibia had consolidated with the exception of the above mentioned fragment.  The Surgeon under whose charge I left him perceived the necessity of removing it by incision as soon as a slight sore throat which Mr B. laboured under subsided.  After the treatment Mr B. received from Com. Elliott I could only urge his coming on board this ship and I insisted on his [obscured] being sent to the Shark.  to leave him in Smyrna was his own request."

 

From Sailmaker James Davis, Charlestown, MA, 29 Mar 1836:

 

        Notes he has been in service since Apr 1821, when he cruised with Commodore Jones in CONSTITUTION until 1824.   Wishes orders to Boston Navy Yard.  [Noted.]

 

Vol 2 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1836)

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Crillon Barton, Smyrna, Asia Minor, 8 Apr 1836:

 

        "...It is now four months since the accident, and my surgeon tells me, it will be unsafe to trust my leg for as many months more, I therefore respectfully request leave of absence for six months from the receipt of this application...  Having heard that our squadron is recalled, I think it necessary to state to you Sir, never having been asked by Commo. Elliott to vindicate myself, that my antagonist Passd Midn Wood insulted me, not only by repeated aspersions on my bravery but, by refusing to mess with me on board the Schr. Shark, an insult which I felt bound for the honor of the button I wear to resent."  {Annotated to inform him the squadron has not been recalled, the leave is therefore not granted, and Commodore Elliott has been told to handle the matter.]

 

From Surgeon Thomas J. Boyd, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Apr 1836:

 

        Requests detachment and permission to return to the U.S. for his health.  [Annotated: return in POTOMAC.]

 

From Midshipman George T. Sinclair, Washington, DC, 25 Apr 1836:

 

        Reports his return to the US from CONSTITUTION; requests leave.  [Granted.]

 

Roll 106, Vol 1 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

From Passed Midshipman J. W. Cooke, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 May 1836:

 

        Requests a 1 year leave to tour Europe.

 

Vol 2 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1836)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 107, Vol. 1 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

From Passed Midshipman Montgomery Lewis, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Jul 1836:

 

        Requests leave of absence and permission to return home due to problems there.  [Granted.]

 

From Assistant Surgeon Victor L. Godon, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Jul 1836:

 

        Requests a 1 year leave of absence at the end of the ship's cruize to travel in Europe.  [No.]

 

Vol 2 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 108, Vol 1 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1836)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 109, Vol 1 (November 1 ‑ 20, 1836)

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Crillon Barton, New York, NY, 18 Nov 1836:

 

        Reports his arrival in New York in the merchant schooner HERO of New Orleans, from Smyrna.

         "...I have been detained in Smyrna, since the 5th of January last, at which period Com. Elliott left with the squadron for Gibraltar.  At the time of Com. Elliott's departure no orders were issued on the event of my recovery, and until the 28th of August last I never heard a word from him.  It was through a letter from Mr. Offley, our Consul at Smyrna, dated Aug 28th (and which is enclosed marked No. 1.) that I received a message from Co. Elliott, saying, that if I were in a state to join my vessel, I could meet her at Malta, early in October.  Com. Elliott however does not give me an order to proceed to Malta but leaves it as you will perceive in a degree optional with myself.  The severe and protracted suffering which I have undergone has coincidentally impaired my health, and  rendered me heretofore incapable of joining with either the squadron or my country; and I hope Sir, that the following reasons will at once be sufficient to reinstate me in the estimation of yourself and my government for a step, which I have been induced to take, solely for the preservation of my leg and my life.

 

"1st     The three surgeons by whom I was attended, thought it imprudent to wander from place to place, the cavity in my leg being nearly an inch deep; and the new  bone formed, extremely tender.   They recommended for my recovery, the climate I was most accustomed to, and pronounced me unfit for duty for twelve months  hence.  In support of which allow me to refer you to the enclosed opinions of the surgeons of H.B.M. ships 'Tribune' and 'Favorite' as well as that of my constant      surgeon V. L. Morpargo of Smyrna, marked No. 2 & 3.

 

"2nd   There had been no opportunity for Malta for some months prior to the receipt of  Mr. Offley's communication, and was now at the time of my sailing 25 days after; nor was any expected shortly to occur, so that it would have been an impossibility for me to reach Malta, and ride out the quarantine of 21 days, by the           time mentioned in Mr. Offley's letter.  In support of which Sir, I refer you to the enclosed certificate from Mr. Offley marked No. 4.

 

"3rd   I did not possess the means of reaching Malta, even had a chance offered, Com. Elliott having left no 'Bill of Credit' for pay since the 31st of last March, from   which time I have been without one cent, in a foreign country, with a broken leg, and entirely destitute of friends and acquaintances, save those I made while there.   In support of this Sir, allow me to refer you to the enclosed certificate from Griffin Smith Esqr, merchant from Baltimore at Smyrna, marked No. 5.

 

        "Subsisting as I was on the generosity of a countryman ‑ daily incurred debts, which the unhappy state of my leg rendered necessary, and which I was unable to pay, and would have been unable to pay, until the arrival of the squadron next year, together with the certificates and opinions, enclosed, will I trust Sir, obliterate any blame that you might impute to me for leaving Smyrna.‑  For this passage to my country Sir, I am even indebted to the generosity of the Captain of the 'Hero.'  Previous to my leaving Smyrna, I wrote Com. Elliott my intentions.  Allow me therefore respectfully to solicit permission to enter the Naval Hospital at this place      until my leg is cured..."

        [Hospitalization ordered.  Enclosures not copied as they are as stated above.]

 

Vol 2 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1836)

 

From Passed Midshipman William T. Muse, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Dec 1836:

 

        Requests a 1 year leave to travel Europe, to begin 13 Mar 1837.  [No.]

 

Roll 110, Vol 1 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 3 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 111, Vol 1 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1837)

 

From Passed Midshipman Charles Crillon Barton, Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, PA, 20 Apr 1837:

 

        Requests release from asylum to recuperative leave.  [Granted.]

 

From Assistant Surgeon D. C. McLeod, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Apr 1837:

 

        Reported to the ship on 28 Jan 1837 and so missed the previous examination for promotion.  Requests permission to return to the US in September or October so as to be present for the next examinations.  [Annotated: "Have him relieved in time..."]

 

Vol 2 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 112, Vol 1 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1837)

 

From Chaplain Thomas R. Lambert, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Jul 1837:

 

        Requests detachment from the ship when next it arrives at Port Mahon, and leave to travel in Europe "until next summer."  Commodore Elliott's endorsement is that he intends returning the Chaplain to UNITED STATES, from whence he came, so he can complete his required sea duty.  [Annotated that leave of absence will be granted at the end of the cruise.]

 

From Lieutenant John Colhoun, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jul 1837:

 

        "I feel that it is not only right, but my duty to represent to you the Conduct of Comme Elliott towards me on the Quarter Deck of this ship, in presence of most of the Officers and ship's company.

        "On the morning of the 23rd Inst, all hands were called to bring ship to an anchor, and I immediately repaired to my station on the Forecastle.  when [sic] hailed by the first Lieut. and ordered to stand by and haul up the Foresail I immediately answered, but before I had time to report that I was ready, the order was given to haul up   the Sail.  It not coming in as soon as the Comme wished, I was sent for by Captain Boerum and asked the reason why the men did not work faster, and why I did not answer the hail from the Quarter Deck.  I replied that I had answered all hails which I had heard, and that I was exerting myself to carry on the duty properly; The Captain appeared satisfied with the explanation, when Comme Elliott addressed me in a loud and angry manner.  'You have not attended to your duty Sir.'  'You do not attend to your duty Sir.'  When I replied I do always attend to my duty Sir, he said 'You do not Sir,' repeating the same words several times and I answering as aforesaid, he concluded by ordering me forward to my duty.

        "On the 24th Instant, immediately after the Comme had finished his dinner, he sent me an order to man his boat, which order was complied with.  when [sic] the Comme was about stepping over the side of the Ship, he turned around and asked for Mr. Darcantel, and I immediately sent a Midshipman for him.  He then asked who was Officer of the Deck, and on replying that I was, he looked fiercely at me and said in a very excited manner, 'I don't like your manner Sir.'  I replied I am not aware of anything improper in my manner Sir, when he repeated the same remark several times, and on my again replying, that I was not aware of any thing improper in my manner, he called out in a loud and angry tone of Voice 'I observed your conduct yesterday Sir,' ‑ 'You have mistaken your man Sir' ‑ "leave the Deck Sir' ‑ 'appoint another Officer in his place Sir.'

        "In making this communication I feel no ordinary sensation and relying on the Justness of my cause, I respectfully submit the case for your consideration, asking that protection to which my rank entitles me."  [Annotated: "File for further consideration."]

 

Vol 2 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 113, Vol 1 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Roll 114, Vol 1 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1837)

 

        NOTHING

 

Vol 2 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1837)

 

From Lieutenant John Colhoun, USS SHARK, 3 Nov 1837:

 

        "...And I again deem it incumbent upon me to lay before the Honble Secretary of the Navy, a statement of Comme Elliott's continued ill treatment towards me.

        "From the time of my being suspended from duty on the 25h of July, I was confined to the Ship by Comme Elliott's order, and denied all the privileges of the other Officers, and visited the Shore but four times, and that by the recommendation of the Surgeon, by confinement in a warm climate.  This lasted until the 26th of October; when (after three months confinement for no Offence, no misconduct, no viola